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Sam’s Club New Membership Deal for $25/$35 With Freebies

Tue, 10/20/2020 - 15:49

Groupon has two new Sam’s Club membership deals, which usually come around only once or twice a year. There are two options. The $25 option (up to $53.99 value) includes:

  • One-year Sam’s Club membership ($45 value)
  • Complimentary membership card for a spouse or other household member
  • Access to Sam’s Club mobile app, Scan & Go, and curbside pickup
  • Member’s Mark Take-n-Bake 16″ pizza ($7.99 to $9.99 value). Choose from items: 980064642, 980064637, 980064638, 980175943, 980064660, 980064644, or 980064640.

The $35 option includes all of the above plus:

  • Member’s Mark Cheesecake (up to $15.98 value). Choose from items: 980088353 or 980088158
  • Member’s Mark 36ct. Dinner Rolls

This deal is for new memberships only, as defined as follows:

Offer valid for new Sam’s Club Members only. Not valid for membership renewals, for those with a current membership, or those who were Sam’s Club members less than 6 months prior to October 15, 2020.

Some folks like to rotate a year with Sam’s Club and a year with Costco, as both usually offer new member deals regularly.

Save even more on your Groupon with a cashback shopping portal. Many offer new customers bonuses if you make a qualifying purchase, including MyPoints ($10 bonus), Rakuten (formerly eBates) ($30 bonus with $30 purchase), TopCashBack (varies), and BeFrugal ($10 bonus). So you could sign-up and stack this Groupon to pickup the bonus. I have cashed out of all of these in the last 12 months.


“The editorial content here is not provided by any of the companies mentioned, and has not been reviewed, approved or otherwise endorsed by any of these entities. Opinions expressed here are the author's alone. This email may contain links through which we are compensated when you click on or are approved for offers.”

Sam’s Club New Membership Deal for $25/$35 With Freebies from My Money Blog.

Copyright © 2019 MyMoneyBlog.com. All Rights Reserved. Do not re-syndicate without permission.

Categories: Finance

Chase Sapphire Preferred, Sapphire Reserve: New Benefits November 2020

Tue, 10/20/2020 - 14:30

Newly added and extended benefits as of November 2020. The Chase Sapphire Preferred card and Chase Sapphire Reserve card have been very popular for their generous travel and dining perks, but right now travel and dining aren’t really happening. Chase has adjusted their rewards program for this new environment, including the following:

Chase Sapphire Preferred new changes:

  • New: 2X points at Grocery Stores. 2x total points on up to $1,000 in grocery store purchases per month from November 1, 2020 to April 30, 2021, including pickup and eligible grocery store delivery services. It’s automatic—no activation required.
  • Extended through April 2021: Redeem Ultimate Rewards points at 1.25 cents per points towards grocery store, dining, and home improvement stores. (Previously only travel through their portal.) Through April 30, 2021, your points are worth 25% more when you redeem them for statement credits after using your card at grocery stores and dining at restaurants (including takeout and eligible delivery services), home improvement stores and select charitable organizations. Footnote1(Opens Overlay) Just choose an eligible purchase made with your Sapphire Preferred card from the past 90 days. Then, apply the points for all or part of the purchase and receive a statement credit.
  • 12+ months of included DashPass membership. For a minimum of one year, enjoy a complimentary DashPass, DoorDash’s subscription service that provides unlimited restaurant deliveries with $0 delivery fee and reduced service fees on eligible orders over $12 on DoorDash and Caviar. Activate by December 31, 2021.

If you earn 2x points on a grocery store purchase, and can use those points at 1.25 cents per point towards grocery store purchases using the Pay Yourself Back tool, that works out to 2.5% cashback towards grocery store purchases.

Chase Sapphire Reserve new changes:

  • New: 3X points at Grocery Stores. 2x total points on up to $1,000 in grocery store purchases per month from November 1, 2020 to April 30, 2021, including pickup and eligible grocery store delivery services. It’s automatic—no activation required.
  • Extended through April 2021: Redeem Ultimate Rewards points at 1.50 cents per points towards grocery store, dining, and home improvement stores. (Previously only travel through their portal.) Through April 30, 2021, your points are worth 50% more when you redeem them for statement credits after using your card at grocery stores and dining at restaurants (including takeout and eligible delivery services), home improvement stores and select charitable organizations. Footnote1(Opens Overlay) Just choose an eligible purchase made with your Sapphire Reserve card from the past 90 days. Then, apply the points for all or part of the purchase and receive a statement credit.
  • Extended through June 2021: $300 annual travel credit works on gas station and grocery store purchases. There are more ways to earn your annual $300 Travel Credit. Through June 30, 2021, gas station and grocery store purchases will count toward earning your Travel Credit. You’ll also earn points on these purchases. And, as always, after your first $300 in travel purchases, you’ll immediately start earning 3x points on travel.
  • 12+ months of Dashpass Membership plus $60 in Doordash food credit per calendar year. For a minimum of one year, enjoy a complimentary DashPass, DoorDash’s subscription service that provides unlimited restaurant deliveries with $0 delivery fee and reduced service fees on eligible orders over $12 on DoorDash and Caviar. Activate by December 31, 2021. Plus, earn up to $120 in statement credits on DoorDash purchases through 2021—that’s $60 in statement credits through 2020 and another $60 in statement credits through 2021.
  • Annual fee renewal $100 discount. Sapphire Reserve annual fee renewals through the end of 2020 will be $450 instead of the normal $550. This is only for renewals, not new cardmembers.

If you earn 3x points on a grocery store purchase, and can use those points at 1.5 cents per point towards grocery store purchases, that works out to 4.5% cashback towards grocery store purchases.


“The editorial content here is not provided by any of the companies mentioned, and has not been reviewed, approved or otherwise endorsed by any of these entities. Opinions expressed here are the author's alone. This email may contain links through which we are compensated when you click on or are approved for offers.”

Chase Sapphire Preferred, Sapphire Reserve: New Benefits November 2020 from My Money Blog.

Copyright © 2019 MyMoneyBlog.com. All Rights Reserved. Do not re-syndicate without permission.

Categories: Finance

Starbucks Mastercard Promo: Buy $15 Gift Card, Get $5 Free

Tue, 10/20/2020 - 14:04

Here’s an easy Starbucks promo: Buy a $15+ Starbucks eGift using a Mastercard, Get a free $5 Starbucks eGift Card. You should be able to see a banner on the front page of your Starbucks app, but the terms say you can order via Starbucks.com too. Choose a custom value to buy exactly $15. Surprise a friend or just give yourself the wonderful gift of caffeine.

Categories: Finance

$45 of Free Grubhub Food: Rakuten $30 + Grubhub 11% Cash Back / $10 Off

Mon, 10/19/2020 - 15:57

There are three separate deals going on right now that are stackable. Altogether, if you sign up for new accounts for Grubhub and Rakuten, you can effectively get about $45 of food for free!

  • $30 Rakuten bonus. Rakuten (formerly eBates) is a cashback shopping portal. Right now, they have an limited-time $30 new user bonus via referral when you make your first purchase of $30+ through any participating Rakuten retailer within 90 days of joining. The standard non-referral bonus is only $10.
  • $10 off first order of $15+ from Grubhub. New users of Grubhub food delivery can get $10 off your first Grubhub order of $15+ and free delivery if you join via my referral link. This comes from Grubhub itself.
  • 11% Cash Back on first Grubhub order via Rakuten app. Rakuten actually gives cash back on Grubhub purchases, which makes it an easy way to trigger the $30 bonus above. In addition, you can get 11% cash back on your first order and also 2% cash back on future orders. You must order via their app.

Here is a detailed step-by-step breakdown:

  • First, sign up for Grubhub here.
  • Next, sign up for Rakuten here.
  • Download the Rakuten app and sign in.
  • Using Rakuten app, search for Grubhub and order within the app.
  • You should be able to apply your $10 off code and also get free delivery on your first order. Be sure that the net order amount after discounts and before tax and tip is a least $30. So order about $45 of food.
  • This will trigger the $30 Rakuten bonus, and then you’ll also see the 11% cash back afterward in your Rakuten balance.

Let’s say you order $45.45 of food. $10 off from Gruhbub + $30 off from Rakuten + 11% cash back = $45 of free food! These are all my referral links and I will get the referrer credit when you use them. Thanks if you use them!

For future orders, you can still get 2% cash back on Grubhub through Rakuten app, on top of any credit card rewards. In addition, you can also get free Gruhhub+ membership with Lyft Pink membership (included with the Chase Sapphire Reserve card).


“The editorial content here is not provided by any of the companies mentioned, and has not been reviewed, approved or otherwise endorsed by any of these entities. Opinions expressed here are the author's alone. This email may contain links through which we are compensated when you click on or are approved for offers.”

$45 of Free Grubhub Food: Rakuten $30 + Grubhub 11% Cash Back / $10 Off from My Money Blog.

Copyright © 2019 MyMoneyBlog.com. All Rights Reserved. Do not re-syndicate without permission.

Categories: Finance

Amazon: Pay with American Express Points, Get 10% to 40% Off (Targeted)

Mon, 10/19/2020 - 15:51

Updated offer links. If you have an American Express card with Membership Rewards (MR) points, you can redeem them to buy eligible items at Amazon.com. The redemption rate is 1 MR points = 0.7 cents to spend at Amazon, which unfortunately is less than a cent per point and thus not really the ideal use of MR points. However, here are targeted promotions where you can save money after redeeming just 1 single MR point.

Here are some additional tips:

  • If you haven’t linked yet, you can link your Membership Rewards points balance to your Amazon account here.
  • If you have already linked your cards and aren’t targeted, you may consider removing your American Express card from your account completely, and then linking it again after a day, and then checking the offer page(s) again after another day.
  • Items must be marked as both sold AND shipped by Amazon.com.
  • Be sure to select your American Express as your payment method and redeem at least 1 point or $0.01 in value of Membership Rewards points.
  • Savings should be reflected on the final order checkout page, before you commit to purchase.

This is a recurring perk for existing American Express cardholders, which is why one of my two “keeper” consumer American Express cards is the Amex EveryDay Card (keeps my Membership Rewards points active with no annual fee, helps qualify for various Amazon promotions). The other is the Blue Cash Preferred from AmEx (6% cash back on US supermarkets, up to $6,000 annually).

You can also earn and keep Membership Rewards points active with a small business card. My favorite business American Express card is the Blue Business Plus Card – 2X MR points on all purchases, of up to $50,000/year. There is also the Blue Business Cash Card that earns a flat 2% cash back on up to $50,000 in purchases each year. Both have no annual fee.


“The editorial content here is not provided by any of the companies mentioned, and has not been reviewed, approved or otherwise endorsed by any of these entities. Opinions expressed here are the author's alone. This email may contain links through which we are compensated when you click on or are approved for offers.”

Amazon: Pay with American Express Points, Get 10% to 40% Off (Targeted) from My Money Blog.

Copyright © 2019 MyMoneyBlog.com. All Rights Reserved. Do not re-syndicate without permission.

Categories: Finance

Born to Run: Is Running Outdoors Another Deeply-Embedded Human Desire?

Sun, 10/18/2020 - 21:46

Recently, I’ve been attracted to books that talk about common qualities of all humans (as opposed to their differences) – like how humans became the dominant species because of their ability to cooperate (Sapiens) and our shared need for autonomy, competence, and community (Tribe). I’m not an avid runner, but Born to Run: A Hidden Tribe, Superathletes, and the Greatest Race the World Has Never Seen by Christopher McDougall suggests that running is another link in that story. Perhaps this ability to run for long distances (extended outdoor exercise) is another way we can achieve a better balance of our mental, physical, and spiritual selves.

The specific race tale in the book is also suspenseful and exciting (once you get past the slow beginning), making this is a recommended read for that reason alone. I don’t want to give spoilers, so here are some highlights that focus on a better life – which of course is the ultimate goal of financial freedom.

The Tarahumara are an indigneous people that live a secluded life in the Sierra Madre canyons of Mexico. They are known for their running ability, but perhaps they aren’t special, but just the ones that have managed to keep what was once a common skill? Put another way – Why do so many people love running?

That was the real secret of the Tarahumara: they’d never forgotten what it felt like to love running. They remembered that running was mankind’s first fine art, our original act of inspired creation.

Know why people run marathons? he told Dr. Bramble. Because running is rooted in our collective imagination, and our imagination is rooted in running. Language, art, science; space shuttles, Starry Night, intravascular surgery; they all had their roots in our ability to run. Running was the superpower that made us human-which means it’s a superpower all humans possess.

“And you’ve got to ask yourself why only one species in the world has the urge to gather by the tens of thousands to run twenty-six miles in the heat for fun,” Dr. Bramble mused. “Recreation has its reasons.”

And like everything else we love – everything we sentimentally call our “passions” and “desires” – it’s really an encoded ancestral necessity. We were born to run; we were born because we run. We’re all Running People, as the Tarahumara have always known.

Human bodies are actually well-suited for distance running. Not running fast, but running for an extended time, longer than most other mammals. Some of our ancestors hunted by simply chasing and outlasting an animal until it collapsed in exhaustion. Perhaps ultra-marathoners are not so unusual after all.

Ethnographers’ reports he’d read years ago began flooding his mind; they told of African hunters who used to chase antelope across the savannahs, and Tarahumara Indians who would race after a deer “until its hooves fell off.” Lieberman had always shrugged them off as tall tales, fables of a golden age of heroes who’d never really existed. […] You don’t even have to go fast, Lieberman realized. All you have to do is keep the animal in sight, and within ten minutes, you’re reeling him in. If a middle-aged professor can outrun a dog on a hot day, imagine what a pack of motivated hunter-gatherers could do to an overheated antelope.”

The best shoes are the worst. This book is a bit of an antidote to the memoir of Nike founder Phil Knight Shoe Dog (which I still enjoyed). What if thick-soled wedge shoes aren’t really solving a problem, just prolonging it?

Bowerman’s marketing was brilliant. “The same man created a market for a product and then created the product itself,” as one Oregon financial columnist observed. “It’s genius, the kind of stuff they study in business schools.” Bowerman’s partner, the runner-turned-entrepreneur Phil Knight, set up a manufacturing deal in Japan and was soon selling shoes faster than they could come off the assembly line.

“Every great cause begins as a movement, becomes a business, and turns into a racket.”

The Tarahumara run long distances on thin sandals. Perhaps we need more of the posture-improving feedback and foot-strengthening from running barefoot:

The way to activate your fat-burning furnace is by staying below your aerobic threshold-your hard-breathing point-during your endurance runs. Respecting that speed limit was a lot easier before the birth of cushioned shoes and paved roads; try blasting up a scree-covered trail in open-toed sandals sometime and you’ll quickly lose the temptation to open the throttle. When your feet aren’t artificially protected, you’re forced to vary your pace and watch your speed: the instant you get recklessly fast and sloppy, the pain shooting up your shins will slow you down.

Like many other ancient cultures, the Tarahumara have a strong sense of and hospitality. When we help each other without expectation, it makes everyone’s life better.

“The Raramuri have no money, but nobody is poor,” Caballo said. In the States, you ask for a glass of water and they take you to a homeless shelter. Here, they take you in and feed you. You ask to camp out, and they say, “Sure, but wouldn’t you rather sleep inside with us?”

Also like many other ancient cultures, eating a primarily plant-based diet gives you all the nutrition you need and lets your body’s natural feedback system tell you when to stop eating. Engineered junk food like Cheetos/Doritos dust and super-sweet everything are designed to keep your body always wanting more. Chia seeds are the natural “energy food” of the Tarahumara tribe.

The first step toward going cancer-free the Tarahumara way, consequently, is simple enough: Eat less. The second step is just as simple on paper, though tougher in practice: Eat better. Along with getting more exercise, says Dr. Weinberg, we need to build our diets around fruit and vegetables instead of red meat and processed carbs. Anything the Tarahumara eat, you can get very easily,” Tony told me. “It’s mostly pinto beans, squash, chili peppers, wild greens, pinole, and lots of chia.”

Outdoor exercise just seems to make you happier:

“Such a sense of joy!” marveled Coach Vigil, who’d never seen anything like it, either. “It was quite remarkable.” Glee and determination are usually antagonistic emotions, yet the Tarahumara were brimming with both at once, as if running to the death made them feel more alive.

I knew aerobic exercise was a powerful antidepressant, but I hadn’t realized it could be so profoundly mood stabilizing and-I hate to use the word-meditative. If you don’t have answers to your problems after a four-hour run, you ain’t getting them.

“Just move your legs. Because if you don’t think you were born to run, you’re not only denying history. You’re denying who you are.”

Finding happiness is often about wanting less (which has the nice side effect of spending less). Nothing mentioned in this book requires a brand-name consumer product or a huge net worth. Run or walk, preferably outdoors, preferably with other people. If you have back or knee problems, try switching gradually to something closer to barefoot (thinner, flatter soles) but keep on walking outside with friends. Eat mostly plants, or at least more plants. Look to help other people. I might also try going for a jog…


“The editorial content here is not provided by any of the companies mentioned, and has not been reviewed, approved or otherwise endorsed by any of these entities. Opinions expressed here are the author's alone. This email may contain links through which we are compensated when you click on or are approved for offers.”

Born to Run: Is Running Outdoors Another Deeply-Embedded Human Desire? from My Money Blog.

Copyright © 2019 MyMoneyBlog.com. All Rights Reserved. Do not re-syndicate without permission.

Categories: Finance

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