Technology

Calling all teens: join the latest round of Google Code-inCalling all teens: join the latest round of Google Code-in

GoogleBlog - Wed, 11/28/2018 - 20:00

Yesterday marked the start of the 7th year of Google Code-in (GCI), our pre-university contest introducing students to open source development. GCI takes place entirely online and is open to students between the ages of 13 and 17 around the globe.

Open source software makes up the backbone of the internet, from servers and routers to the phone in your pocket, but it’s a community-driven effort. Google Code-in serves a dual purpose of encouraging young developers and ensuring that open source communities continue to grow.

The concept is simple: students complete bite-sized tasks created by 17 participating open source organizations on topic areas of their choice, including:

  • Coding

  • Documentation/Training

  • Outreach/Research

  • Quality Assurance

  • User Interface

Tasks take an average of 3-5 hours to complete and include the guidance of a mentor to help along the way. Complete one task? Get a digital certificate. Three tasks? Get a Google t-shirt. Mentor organizations pick finalists and grand prize winners from among the 10 students who contributed most to that organization. Finalists get a hoodie and Grand Prize winners get a trip to Google headquarters in California where they meet Googlers, mentors and fellow winners.  

Google Code-in began with 361 students from 45 countries and has grown to include, in 2015, 980 students from 65 countries. You can read about the experiences of past participants on the Google Open Source blog. Over the last 6 years, more than 3,000 students from 99 countries have successfully completed tasks in GCI.

Student Ahmed Sabie had this to say, “Overall, Google Code-in was the experience of a lifetime. It set me up for the future by teaching me relevant and critical skills necessary in software development.”

Know of a student who might be interested? Learn more about GCI by checking out our rules and FAQs. And please visit our contest site and read the Getting Started Guide. Teachers, you can find additional resources here to help get your students started.

The Google Code-in contest is now open! Students ages 13 to 17 gain real-world software development experience by building open source software with the support of mentors.
Categories: Technology

Calling all teens: join the latest round of Google Code-inCalling all teens: join the latest round of Google Code-in

GoogleBlog - Wed, 11/28/2018 - 20:00

Yesterday marked the start of the 7th year of Google Code-in (GCI), our pre-university contest introducing students to open source development. GCI takes place entirely online and is open to students between the ages of 13 and 17 around the globe.

Open source software makes up the backbone of the internet, from servers and routers to the phone in your pocket, but it’s a community-driven effort. Google Code-in serves a dual purpose of encouraging young developers and ensuring that open source communities continue to grow.

The concept is simple: students complete bite-sized tasks created by 17 participating open source organizations on topic areas of their choice, including:

  • Coding

  • Documentation/Training

  • Outreach/Research

  • Quality Assurance

  • User Interface

Tasks take an average of 3-5 hours to complete and include the guidance of a mentor to help along the way. Complete one task? Get a digital certificate. Three tasks? Get a Google t-shirt. Mentor organizations pick finalists and grand prize winners from among the 10 students who contributed most to that organization. Finalists get a hoodie and Grand Prize winners get a trip to Google headquarters in California where they meet Googlers, mentors and fellow winners.  

Google Code-in began with 361 students from 45 countries and has grown to include, in 2015, 980 students from 65 countries. You can read about the experiences of past participants on the Google Open Source blog. Over the last 6 years, more than 3,000 students from 99 countries have successfully completed tasks in GCI.

Student Ahmed Sabie had this to say, “Overall, Google Code-in was the experience of a lifetime. It set me up for the future by teaching me relevant and critical skills necessary in software development.”

Know of a student who might be interested? Learn more about GCI by checking out our rules and FAQs. And please visit our contest site and read the Getting Started Guide. Teachers, you can find additional resources here to help get your students started.

The Google Code-in contest is now open! Students ages 13 to 17 gain real-world software development experience by building open source software with the support of mentors.
Categories: Technology

Digital security and due process: A new legal framework for the cloud eraDigital security and due process: A new legal framework for the cloud era

GoogleBlog - 5 hours 13 min ago

Editor’s note: This is an abbreviated version of a speech Kent delivered today at The Heritage Foundation in Washington, D.C.

For as long as we’ve had legal systems, prosecutors and police have needed to gather evidence. And for each new advance in communications, law enforcement has adapted. With the advent of the post office, police got warrants to search letters and packages. With the arrival of telephones, police served subpoenas for the call logs of suspects. Digital communications have now gone well beyond the Postal Service and Ma Bell. But the laws that govern evidence-gathering on the internet were written before the Information Revolution, and are now both hindering the flow of information to law enforcement and jeopardizing user privacy as a result.

These rules are due for a fundamental realignment in light of the rapid growth of technology that relies on the cloud, the very real security threats that face people and communities, and the expectations of privacy that internet users have in their communications.

Today, we’re proposing a new framework that allows countries that commit to baseline privacy, human rights, and due process principles to gather evidence more quickly and efficiently. We believe these reforms would not only help law enforcement conduct more effective investigations but also encourage countries to improve and align on privacy and due process standards. Further, reducing the amount of time countries have to wait to gather evidence means would reduce the pressure to pursue more problematic ways of trying to gather data.

Current laws hinder law enforcement and user privacy

The U.S. Electronic Communications Privacy Act (ECPA) governs requests for content from law enforcement. Under ECPA, foreign countries largely have to rely on diplomatic mechanisms such as Mutual Legal Assistance Treaties (MLAT) to obtain content that is held by a company in the United States. The last data we’ve seen suggests that the average wait to receive content through the MLAT process is 10 months, far too long for most criminal cases. While law enforcement waits for this data, crimes could remain unsolved or a trial might happen missing key evidence.

The current legal framework poses a threat to users’ privacy as well. Faced with the extended delays under the MLAT process, some countries are now asserting that their laws apply to companies and individuals outside of their borders. Countries asserting extraterritorial authority potentially put companies in an untenable situation where we risk violating either the law of the requesting country or the law of the country where we are headquartered.

We are also seeing various proposals to require companies to store data within local borders as a means to gain easier access. There are a host of problems with this: small, one-off data centers are easier targets for attackers and jeopardize data security and privacy. Further, requiring businesses to build these data-centers will raise the costs for cloud services, erecting significant barriers for smaller companies.

The legal ambiguity concerning cross-border law enforcement requests has also created complications for law enforcement in the United States. Last year, the Second Circuit Court of Appeals was asked to determine the reach of ECPA search warrants issued under the now out-of-date statute. The Court ruled that under existing law, an ECPA search warrant cannot be used to compel service providers to disclose user data that is stored outside of the U.S. But even those judges agreed that ECPA should be updated by Congress to reflect the new reality of today’s global networks.

Principles for reform

Our proposal to address these challenges for domestic and international law enforcement, for companies, and for users has two core principles:

First, countries that honor baseline principles of privacy, human rights, and due process should be able to make direct requests to service providers for user data that pertains to serious crimes that happen within their borders and users who are within their jurisdiction.  

While the U.S. cannot solve the problem on its own, and many countries have blocking regulations, policy reform in the US is a necessary first step. We’ve been pleased to see serious debate around ways to update digital evidence laws in Washington on this issue.

In May, the U.S. Department of Justice presented legislation that would amend ECPA and  authorize U.S. providers to disclose records and communications content to foreign governments that adhere to baseline due process, human rights, and privacy standards. This legislation would be the critical starting point for the new framework of direct requests.

ECPA should also be updated to address what data is available using an ECPA search warrant in a way that serves broader public policy objectives. Law enforcement requests for digital evidence should be based on the location and nationality of users, not the location of data. A key component of this reform is the International Communications Privacy Act (ICPA), which Google supports. ICPA provides a unique opportunity for Congress to update laws governing digital evidence both for investigations in the U.S. and abroad. While refinements to ICPA may be necessary, we believe the principles upon which ICPA is based are sound.

Second, provided that countries can meet baseline standards and the U.S. amends ECPA, the next step would be for the United States and foreign governments to sign new agreements that could provide an alternative to the MLAT process. The bilateral agreements that could be authorized by the legislation put forward by the Department of Justice provide a promising avenue to improve global privacy standards and create a pathway for foreign governments to obtain digital evidence for investigations.

We’re ready to do our part

We know that this will be an involved process. It’ll require action here in Washington and in capitals around the world. However, we can’t accept the complexity of action as a reason for inaction in addressing an important and growing problem.

Our proposal asks for a lot of movement from governments. But we recognize our role as well. Google is ready to work with legislators, regulators, civil society, academics, and other companies to progress these proposals and make sure that we get this right. And I look forward to conversations that we’ll have in Washington, D.C. and beyond in the months to come.

An abbreviated version of a speech Kent Walker, SVP and General Counsel, delivered at The Heritage Foundation in Washington, D.C.
Categories: Technology

Namaste from your Google AssistantNamaste from your Google Assistant

GoogleBlog - Wed, 06/21/2017 - 14:00

Ommmmmm, it's International Yoga Day. While your Assistant might not be able to do an Eagle Pose, it can help you relax, learn about yoga poses and be the calming presence you’ve been looking for.

  • If you’re an aspiring yogi, the first step is getting on the mat. Ask your Assistant on Google Home to “Add yoga mat to my shopping list.” 
  • Once you've got your mat, you can ask your Assistant on phones, “What’s a downward-facing dog pose?” or ““Show me videos of a downward-facing dog pose.”
  • Looking to set the mood? Ask your Assistant on Google Home to “Turn the temperature to 80 degrees,” or “Dim the lights,” when you’re ready for Savasana. 
  • Interested in learning about the history of yoga? Ask your Assistant on Google Home “How did yoga start?” or “What does yoga mean?”
  • Or maybe you want to meet other like-minded yogis: Ask your Assistant on phones to “Find yoga classes near me.”

For the love of yoga and whatever else makes you happy, go out there and find your zen! Namaste.

Today is International Yoga Day and while your Assistant might not be able to do an Eagle Pose, it can help you relax, learn and be the calming presence you’ve been looking for.
Categories: Technology

Namaste from your Google AssistantNamaste from your Google Assistant

GoogleBlog - Wed, 06/21/2017 - 14:00

Ommmmmm, it's International Yoga Day. While your Assistant might not be able to do an Eagle Pose, it can help you relax, learn about yoga poses and be the calming presence you’ve been looking for.

  • If you’re an aspiring yogi, the first step is getting on the mat. Ask your Assistant on Google Home to “Add yoga mat to my shopping list.” 
  • Once you've got your mat, you can ask your Assistant on phones, “What’s a downward-facing dog pose?” or ““Show me videos of a downward-facing dog pose.”
  • Looking to set the mood? Ask your Assistant on Google Home to “Turn the temperature to 80 degrees,” or “Dim the lights,” when you’re ready for Savasana. 
  • Interested in learning about the history of yoga? Ask your Assistant on Google Home “How did yoga start?” or “What does yoga mean?”
  • Or maybe you want to meet other like-minded yogis: Ask your Assistant on phones to “Find yoga classes near me.”

For the love of yoga and whatever else makes you happy, go out there and find your zen! Namaste.

Today is International Yoga Day and while your Assistant might not be able to do an Eagle Pose, it can help you relax, learn and be the calming presence you’ve been looking for.
Categories: Technology

Celebrating 10 years of GoogleServeCelebrating 10 years of GoogleServe

GoogleBlog - Wed, 06/21/2017 - 11:00

Every June, we celebrate GoogleServe—a month-long campaign to empower Googlers to volunteer in their communities. Googlers have clocked more than 200,000 hours during GoogleServe since it first began in 2007, and the program has inspired a culture of giving and volunteering all year long. As we celebrate our 10th annual GoogleServe, we’re talking with Seth Marbin, the Googler who first came up with the idea.

Keyword: How did the idea for GoogleServe come about?

Seth: I joined the Search Quality team at Google 11 years ago. I was inspired by the company’s culture, social mission, and the belief that any employee could dream up the next big idea. In 2007, our VP of Culture Stacy Sullivan asked Googlers for ideas on how to maintain our unique culture while the company doubled in size. My work with AmeriCorps and City Year taught me that volunteering can bring people together and break down social barriers, so I proposed a global day of community service (which I called Google-palooza!). Googlers jumped on board immediately, and 3,000 Googlers from 45 offices participated in our first GoogleServe.

How has GoogleServe changed over the years?

Well, for starters, it’s a lot bigger! And it’s inspired Googlers to serve beyond the month of June. Googlers now volunteer a quarter of a million hours each year outside GoogleServe, through Google.org programs.

We still provide hands-on help to schools, soup kitchens and homeless shelters, but we’ve evolved GoogleServe to connect Googlers’ professional expertise to nonprofit and community needs. For example, software engineers participate in hackathons, and our recruitment and staffing teams review resumes and conduct interview skills trainings for people who are unemployed or underemployed.

There are 20,000 Googlers volunteering this month. How do you pull off such a massive undertaking?

We work with great partners who ensure that our volunteers have meaningful experiences. For example, HandsOn Bay Area—which helps Googlers find volunteer opportunities—has been a fantastic and committed partner from the beginning. When we came to them in 2012 with 5,500 Google volunteers, we maxed out their capacity to help. They didn’t have the infrastructure to deal with a group of our size, but over time they adjusted and scaled their model so that they could continue working with us. It’s been such a pleasure to watch their evolution, because we wouldn’t be able to run GoogleServe without them. Our partnership was even written about as a case study for Harvard Business School.

What have been your favorite projects over the years?

My favorite projects tap into Googler expertise, align with our company values—like supporting women in tech—and have a lasting impact. U.S. Googlers have volunteered with schools and nonprofits to host Made with Code events, inspiring thousands of girls to consider careers in computer science. In two days of coding, 10 Googlers helped the OpenAustralia Foundation give two million people access to Planning Alerts, which notify residents about local construction and demolition projects. And a team of Googlers in our Seattle office helped launch a mobile app to enable RealChange homeless newspaper vendors to accept digital payments.

How has GoogleServe impacted Googlers?

I’ve found that many Googlers start out with one GoogleServe project and then discover a deeper passion for serving the community. Rebecca Howarth, who helps lead GoogleServe in the Bay Area, told me it’s the single most important part of her career at Google—and it’s not even her “real job.”

For some Googlers, the impact has been so great that they’ve committed their careers to community service. In 2012 Megan Wheeler joined our team as a 20 percenter (Googlers can dedicate 20 percent of their time, outside of their day job, on projects that they’re passionate about), and now she runs the program globally as part of her full time role on the Google.org team.

And it inspires others to continue to serve beyond Google. Former Googler Tory Faries participated in a GoogleServe project in 2010, helping to paint a youth homeless shelter in San Francisco. She was so inspired that she became a weekly volunteer at the shelter. Years later, she has helped to build and lead the global volunteer program at Airbnb.

How has GoogleServe influenced Google’s culture?

When Stacy sent out her email 10 years ago, I believed that a commitment to community service would keep our culture strong no matter how big the company became, and I still believe that today. GoogleServe connects Googlers to causes and community organizations they care about, but it also connects them to other Googlers they wouldn’t have met otherwise. Those bonds are the reason people continue to volunteer with us, and why GoogleServe has become such a big part of our company culture.

Why have you dedicated your career to service?

Community service has always been a part of my life. My wife and I met doing community service and we even incorporated it into our wedding! Before the ceremony, our guests planted seeds on an organic farm that grows food for low-income families. And my kids are a part of GoogleServe too—my daughter Kaia was born just before the first GoogleServe and she and my younger son Jahan have attended a GoogleServe project every year.

So while I’ve always had a passion for service, being a part of the GoogleServe founding team and Google.org honed my life’s mission: to serve and help others serve, to build a better, more compassionate, inclusive, peaceful and just world. I feel incredibly fortunate to work on this every day at Google with an amazing team of passionate colleagues.

What’s your advice for people outside of Google who are interested in starting a volunteering program at their company?

Launch and iterate. Don’t wait for all the details—just get your idea out there and invite others to join in. Volunteering is good for company culture, good for our communities, and good for the world. There’s a growing movement of social intrapreneurs and entrepreneurs working to create positive social change, and there are many case studies and guides that can help anyone create change in their local community.

Kaia Marbin helps her dad during a GoogleServe project in 2011 Kaia & Jahan Marbin are ready to get their serve on this year Googlers in Dublin help clean up at a local park (2010) Providing AdGrants support to nonprofits in 2016 Singapore Googlers volunteer at a beach clean up project Planting a community garden in Hyderabad (2009) Googlers in Nigeria partner with a graduate school during GoogleServe in 2015 Painting a school in Mexico (2011)
Categories: Technology

The SAP-Google data custodian partnershipThe SAP-Google data custodian partnership

GoogleBlog - Wed, 06/21/2017 - 11:00

In March of this year, SAP and Google partnered to advance innovation, agility and global reach for enterprises adopting the public cloud. As part of our collaborative development and solutions integration, we are working on a data custodian model that allows customers with specific needs to manage sensitive data on a public cloud platform.

To fully benefit from cloud computing, enterprises need to store and process their sensitive data on public cloud platforms, while complying with regulations and managing unauthorized access risks. Enterprises often need to address these requirements as part of a broader governance, risk and compliance solution for the public cloud. 

The data custodian model

Google Cloud Platform (GCP) already offers robust security capabilities and extensive compliance with public cloud security and privacy standards. To further increase customer trust, the data custodian model allows SAP, a trusted enterprise solution provider, to act as the custodian of the customer’s data on GCP. This provides greater transparency and separation of controls.

With the data custodian model, we envision enterprises defining a set of controls about how they want to handle their data on GCP, then relying on SAP, as the data custodian, to continuously monitor compliance to these controls and manage exceptions as needed. A current focus is on data access transparency for GCP services that store or process customer data. In the coming months, SAP and Google will continue to work together to enable custodian oversight and control over handling customer data on GCP. 

What are the benefits for customers?

Enterprises can benefit from the data custodian model in several ways. They can leverage SAP’s deep knowledge of GCP’s security approach, controls and workflows instead of building that expertise in-house. With SAP as a data custodian, customers have additional confidence that their data is accessed and stored in compliance with their defined data sovereignty, privacy and protection policies.

In addition, with this partnership, SAP and Google are extending and integrating their product portfolios, including GCP and G Suite to provide even greater value to customers. Look to SAP and Google to continue to collaborate on solutions like the data custodian model to enable the next generation of digital services.

Together, SAP and Google are working on a data custodian model that allows customers with specific needs to manage sensitive data on a public cloud platform.
Categories: Technology

Celebrating 10 years of GoogleServeCelebrating 10 years of GoogleServe

GoogleBlog - Wed, 06/21/2017 - 11:00

Every June, we celebrate GoogleServe—a month-long campaign to empower Googlers to volunteer in their communities. Googlers have clocked more than 200,000 hours during GoogleServe since it first began in 2007, and the program has inspired a culture of giving and volunteering all year long. As we celebrate our 10th annual GoogleServe, we’re talking with Seth Marbin, the Googler who first came up with the idea.

Keyword: How did the idea for GoogleServe come about?

Seth: I joined the Search Quality team at Google 11 years ago. I was inspired by the company’s culture, social mission, and the belief that any employee could dream up the next big idea. In 2007, our VP of Culture Stacy Sullivan asked Googlers for ideas on how to maintain our unique culture while the company doubled in size. My work with AmeriCorps and City Year taught me that volunteering can bring people together and break down social barriers, so I proposed a global day of community service (which I called Google-palooza!). Googlers jumped on board immediately, and 3,000 Googlers from 45 offices participated in our first GoogleServe.

How has GoogleServe changed over the years?

Well, for starters, it’s a lot bigger! And it’s inspired Googlers to serve beyond the month of June. Googlers now volunteer a quarter of a million hours each year outside GoogleServe, through Google.org programs.

We still provide hands-on help to schools, soup kitchens and homeless shelters, but we’ve evolved GoogleServe to connect Googlers’ professional expertise to nonprofit and community needs. For example, software engineers participate in hackathons, and our recruitment and staffing teams review resumes and conduct interview skills trainings for people who are unemployed or underemployed.

There are 20,000 Googlers volunteering this month. How do you pull off such a massive undertaking?

We work with great partners who ensure that our volunteers have meaningful experiences. For example, HandsOn Bay Area—which helps Googlers find volunteer opportunities—has been a fantastic and committed partner from the beginning. When we came to them in 2012 with 5,500 Google volunteers, we maxed out their capacity to help. They didn’t have the infrastructure to deal with a group of our size, but over time they adjusted and scaled their model so that they could continue working with us. It’s been such a pleasure to watch their evolution, because we wouldn’t be able to run GoogleServe without them. Our partnership was even written about as a case study for Harvard Business School.

What have been your favorite projects over the years?

My favorite projects tap into Googler expertise, align with our company values—like supporting women in tech—and have a lasting impact. U.S. Googlers have volunteered with schools and nonprofits to host Made with Code events, inspiring thousands of girls to consider careers in computer science. In two days of coding, 10 Googlers helped the OpenAustralia Foundation give two million people access to Planning Alerts, which notify residents about local construction and demolition projects. And a team of Googlers in our Seattle office helped launch a mobile app to enable RealChange homeless newspaper vendors to accept digital payments.

How has GoogleServe impacted Googlers?

I’ve found that many Googlers start out with one GoogleServe project and then discover a deeper passion for serving the community. Rebecca Howarth, who helps lead GoogleServe in the Bay Area, told me it’s the single most important part of her career at Google—and it’s not even her “real job.”

For some Googlers, the impact has been so great that they’ve committed their careers to community service. In 2012 Megan Wheeler joined our team as a 20 percenter (Googlers can dedicate 20 percent of their time, outside of their day job, on projects that they’re passionate about), and now she runs the program globally as part of her full time role on the Google.org team.

And it inspires others to continue to serve beyond Google. Former Googler Tory Faries participated in a GoogleServe project in 2010, helping to paint a youth homeless shelter in San Francisco. She was so inspired that she became a weekly volunteer at the shelter. Years later, she has helped to build and lead the global volunteer program at Airbnb.

How has GoogleServe influenced Google’s culture?

When Stacy sent out her email 10 years ago, I believed that a commitment to community service would keep our culture strong no matter how big the company became, and I still believe that today. GoogleServe connects Googlers to causes and community organizations they care about, but it also connects them to other Googlers they wouldn’t have met otherwise. Those bonds are the reason people continue to volunteer with us, and why GoogleServe has become such a big part of our company culture.

Why have you dedicated your career to service?

Community service has always been a part of my life. My wife and I met doing community service and we even incorporated it into our wedding! Before the ceremony, our guests planted seeds on an organic farm that grows food for low-income families. And my kids are a part of GoogleServe too—my daughter Kaia was born just before the first GoogleServe and she and my younger son Jahan have attended a GoogleServe project every year.

So while I’ve always had a passion for service, being a part of the GoogleServe founding team and Google.org honed my life’s mission: to serve and help others serve, to build a better, more compassionate, inclusive, peaceful and just world. I feel incredibly fortunate to work on this every day at Google with an amazing team of passionate colleagues.

What’s your advice for people outside of Google who are interested in starting a volunteering program at their company?

Launch and iterate. Don’t wait for all the details—just get your idea out there and invite others to join in. Volunteering is good for company culture, good for our communities, and good for the world. There’s a growing movement of social intrapreneurs and entrepreneurs working to create positive social change, and there are many case studies and guides that can help anyone create change in their local community.

Kaia Marbin helps her dad during a GoogleServe project in 2011 Kaia & Jahan Marbin are ready to get their serve on this year Googlers in Dublin help clean up at a local park (2010) Providing AdGrants support to nonprofits in 2016 Singapore Googlers volunteer at a beach clean up project Planting a community garden in Hyderabad (2009) Googlers in Nigeria partner with a graduate school during GoogleServe in 2015 Painting a school in Mexico (2011)
Categories: Technology

The SAP-Google data custodian partnershipThe SAP-Google data custodian partnership

GoogleBlog - Wed, 06/21/2017 - 11:00

In March of this year, SAP and Google partnered to advance innovation, agility and global reach for enterprises adopting the public cloud. As part of our collaborative development and solutions integration, we are working on a data custodian model that allows customers with specific needs to manage sensitive data on a public cloud platform.

To fully benefit from cloud computing, enterprises need to store and process their sensitive data on public cloud platforms, while complying with regulations and managing unauthorized access risks. Enterprises often need to address these requirements as part of a broader governance, risk and compliance solution for the public cloud. 

The data custodian model

Google Cloud Platform (GCP) already offers robust security capabilities and extensive compliance with public cloud security and privacy standards. To further increase customer trust, the data custodian model allows SAP, a trusted enterprise solution provider, to act as the custodian of the customer’s data on GCP. This provides greater transparency and separation of controls.

With the data custodian model, we envision enterprises defining a set of controls about how they want to handle their data on GCP, then relying on SAP, as the data custodian, to continuously monitor compliance to these controls and manage exceptions as needed. A current focus is on data access transparency for GCP services that store or process customer data. In the coming months, SAP and Google will continue to work together to enable custodian oversight and control over handling customer data on GCP. 

What are the benefits for customers?

Enterprises can benefit from the data custodian model in several ways. They can leverage SAP’s deep knowledge of GCP’s security approach, controls and workflows instead of building that expertise in-house. With SAP as a data custodian, customers have additional confidence that their data is accessed and stored in compliance with their defined data sovereignty, privacy and protection policies.

In addition, with this partnership, SAP and Google are extending and integrating their product portfolios, including GCP and G Suite to provide even greater value to customers. Look to SAP and Google to continue to collaborate on solutions like the data custodian model to enable the next generation of digital services.

Together, SAP and Google are working on a data custodian model that allows customers with specific needs to manage sensitive data on a public cloud platform.
Categories: Technology

Can I fake my location on Facebook posts?

AskDaveTaylor - Wed, 06/21/2017 - 10:45

Facebook is like a palette of paints ready for action; there’s not much you can’t do when you’re on Facebook if you’re enthusiastic enough. You can most assuredly make it look exactly like you’re in some far-flung locale though it’s a bit trickier showing something just to one person versus everyone that you’re friends with or the public at large.

To start out, I’d recommend you pick a specific city or location in Mexico and check the timezone versus your own, so you don’t confuse people and give your brother reason to doubt the veracity of what you’re posting. Also hop over to Google Images and grab some photos from the location – but I’ll get back to that in a minute or two – and if you really want to be an overachiever, Photoshop yourself into some pictures! That’s not easy to do well, however, so it might be above and beyond.

To start, I’ll post a status update on Facebook that makes it look like I am at the White House in Washington DC. Let’s start by grabbing an image of the White House from Google Image Search:

Though the odds of the image being discovered by the owner is very low if you’re going to post so that only your brother can see it, it’s still reasonable to be at least roughly aware of copyright. A good choice is a photo from any government site – like the White House site itself – because they’re all in the public domain. Find one you like and save it to your desktop.

Now we can head over to Facebook itself to start composing the status update. Lots of options as Facebook moves ever closer to MySpace territory:

See the “Check In” option on the lower left. That’s critical to our deception. Click on it.

By default it shows your current location and previous locations both:

The secret here is that you can type in anything you want to find locations! Let’s try it with “eiffel”:

Hey, you can check in at the Eiffel Tower (more properly Tour Eiffel) easily enough! But I want to be at the White House, so I’ll type that in as an alternative search. You can, of course, specify a town in Mexico:

Did you know there was a separate check-in for Obama’s White House? Didn’t know he had purchased the place! I’ll click on the #1 match as that’s the official White House Facebook Check In Spot.

Next up, I’ll specify a Feeling/Activity that’s thematically relevant: Patriotic!

Last step once you’ve specified that: Click on “Public” on the status update box to bring up this set of choices:

You want to choose “More…” so you can specify just your brother!

Choose this option – Specific friends – and then choose your brother. Now the bottom of the status update window will look like this:

My post I’m going to share with everyone by leaving the choice as “Public” but you might want to just have your brother see your fake status update. Then again, he’d see that it wasn’t a public post so he might be a bit suspicious! Here’s what I ended up with:

As you can see, people buy basically whatever you post, and I’ve already garnered nine likes, nine people who seem to believe that I was indeed in Washington DC at the White House. Hope your efforts are as successful!

The post Can I fake my location on Facebook posts? appeared first on Ask Dave Taylor.

Categories: Technology

How The New York Times used the Google Sheets API to report congressional votes in real timeHow The New York Times used the Google Sheets API to report congressional votes in real time

GoogleBlog - Tue, 06/20/2017 - 12:00

There’s a common phrase among reporters: “The news never sleeps.” This is why many news outlets rely on cloud-based productivity tools like Google Docs and Sheets to share information, check facts and collaborate in real time. And The New York Times is no exception.

In May 2017, the U.S. House of Representatives voted on a new health care law affecting millions of Americans. To report the news as fast as possible, The Times’ editorial team used Sheets to tally and display House votes in real time on NYTimes.com.


Engaging voters with the Sheets API

“People want to feel connected to the decisions their legislators make as soon as they make them,” said Tom Giratikanon,  a graphics editor at The Times. But rules in the House chamber make reporting on how every representative votes in real time difficult. Photography is restricted on the assembly floor, and there is a delay until all votes are displayed on the House website—a process that can sometimes take up to an hour.

To get around this lag, Giratikanon’s team used the Google Sheets API. The editorial team dispatched reporters to the chamber where they entered votes into a Google Sheet as they were shown on the vote boards. The sheet then auto-populated NYTimes.com using the Sheets API integration.

Says Giratikanon: “It’s easy to feel like decisions are veiled in the political process. Technology is a powerful way to bridge that gap. Sharing news immediately empowers our readers.”

It’s easy to feel like decisions are veiled in the political process. Technology is a powerful way to bridge that gap. Tom Giratikanon Graphics Editor, The New York Times How it worked

To prep, Giratikanon tested the Sheets integration ahead of the House vote. He created a sheet listing the names of legislators in advance, so his team could avoid typos when entering data on the day of the vote. Next, he set up the Sheet to include qualifiers. A simple “Y” or “N” indicated “yes” and “no” votes.

After a few practice rounds, Giratikanon’s team realized they could add even more qualifiers to better inform readers–like flagging outlier votes and reporting on votes by party (i.e., Democrats vs. Republicans). The editorial team researched how each of the 431 legislators were expected to vote in advance. They created a rule in Sheets to automatically highlight surprises. If a legislator went against the grain, the sheet highlighted the cell in yellow and the editorial team fact-checked the original vote to reflect this in the article. Giratikanon also set up a rule to note votes by party.

As a result, The Times, which has roughly 2 million digital-only subscribers, beat the House website, reporting the new healthcare bill results and informing readers who were eager to follow how their legislator voted. 

Try G Suite APIs today 

You can use Sheets and other G Suite products to help speed up real-time reporting, no matter the industry. Get started using the Sheets API today or check out other G Suite APIs, like the Slides API, Gmail API or Calendar API.

Categories: Technology

Call it even with Project Fi’s group repayCall it even with Project Fi’s group repay

GoogleBlog - Tue, 06/20/2017 - 12:00

More than 75% of adults share their wireless plans with at least one other person.1 And while it’s nice to share a plan with the people you love, splitting the bill can be tough. It takes work to calculate how much each person owes and can feel awkward to remind others to pay you back.

To take the headache out of sharing your wireless plan, today we’re introducing group repay—an easier way to split your Project Fi group plan bill. Each month, we’ll calculate participating members’ portion of the bill, send out payment reminders, and provide a simple way for members to repay plan owners directly through Project Fi.

Know what you owe—no math required

You shouldn’t have to pull out a calculator every month to figure out everyone’s share of the phone bill. There are many different ways to split the bill, but whatever you decide, Project Fi will do the math. Once you’ve selected the option that works best for you, Project Fi will automatically calculate the correct amount.


Easy setup, reminders, and payments

Any Project Fi plan owner or member can set up monthly repayment reminders with group repay. If you’re a plan owner, simply select a repayment amount for each member. When it’s time to pay the bill, Project Fi will send repayment notifications to group plan members.

Thanks to an integration with Google Wallet, sending and receiving payments is just as simple. Plan members can simply tap the notification and hit “Send Money” to complete the request. Owners can even cash out repayments automatically to a debit card or checking account.

One simple place to view, manage, and track payments

We know it’s hard to manage all of your monthly bills, so we’ll help you track your Project Fi payment history. With group repay, you can easily view your full payment history and payment statuses for the current month.

Getting started with group repay is easy. If you are currently on a Project Fi group plan, simply navigate to your account billing section to manage your settings. We're beginning to roll out this feature today, and it will be available to all Project Fi users by the end of the week.

Finally, for a limited time, when Project Fi plan owners add a new member to their group plan, both will receive a free month of Fi Basics. For more details, see our FAQ.

(1) Source: Google Consumer Survey, U.S. smartphone owners, May 2017 (n=500)


Group repay from Project Fi makes sharing a wireless plan easier than ever.
Categories: Technology

How The New York Times used the Google Sheets API to report congressional votes in real timeHow The New York Times used the Google Sheets API to report congressional votes in real time

GoogleBlog - Tue, 06/20/2017 - 12:00

There’s a common phrase among reporters: “The news never sleeps.” This is why many news outlets rely on cloud-based productivity tools like Google Docs and Sheets to share information, check facts and collaborate in real time. And The New York Times is no exception.

In May 2017, the U.S. House of Representatives voted on a new health care law affecting millions of Americans. To report the news as fast as possible, The Times’ editorial team used Sheets to tally and display House votes in real time on NYTimes.com.


Engaging voters with the Sheets API

“People want to feel connected to the decisions their legislators make as soon as they make them,” said Tom Giratikanon,  a graphics editor at The Times. But rules in the House chamber make reporting on how every representative votes in real time difficult. Photography is restricted on the assembly floor, and there is a delay until all votes are displayed on the House website—a process that can sometimes take up to an hour.

To get around this lag, Giratikanon’s team used the Google Sheets API. The editorial team dispatched reporters to the chamber where they entered votes into a Google Sheet as they were shown on the vote boards. The sheet then auto-populated NYTimes.com using the Sheets API integration.

Says Giratikanon: “It’s easy to feel like decisions are veiled in the political process. Technology is a powerful way to bridge that gap. Sharing news immediately empowers our readers.”

It’s easy to feel like decisions are veiled in the political process. Technology is a powerful way to bridge that gap. Tom Giratikanon Graphics Editor, The New York Times How it worked

To prep, Giratikanon tested the Sheets integration ahead of the House vote. He created a sheet listing the names of legislators in advance, so his team could avoid typos when entering data on the day of the vote. Next, he set up the Sheet to include qualifiers. A simple “Y” or “N” indicated “yes” and “no” votes.

After a few practice rounds, Giratikanon’s team realized they could add even more qualifiers to better inform readers–like flagging outlier votes and reporting on votes by party (i.e., Democrats vs. Republicans). The editorial team researched how each of the 431 legislators were expected to vote in advance. They created a rule in Sheets to automatically highlight surprises. If a legislator went against the grain, the sheet highlighted the cell in yellow and the editorial team fact-checked the original vote to reflect this in the article. Giratikanon also set up a rule to note votes by party.

As a result, The Times, which has roughly 2 million digital-only subscribers, beat the House website, reporting the new healthcare bill results and informing readers who were eager to follow how their legislator voted. 

Try G Suite APIs today 

You can use Sheets and other G Suite products to help speed up real-time reporting, no matter the industry. Get started using the Sheets API today or check out other G Suite APIs, like the Slides API, Gmail API or Calendar API.

Categories: Technology

Call it even with Project Fi’s group repayCall it even with Project Fi’s group repay

GoogleBlog - Tue, 06/20/2017 - 12:00

More than 75% of adults share their wireless plans with at least one other person.1 And while it’s nice to share a plan with the people you love, splitting the bill can be tough. It takes work to calculate how much each person owes and can feel awkward to remind others to pay you back.

To take the headache out of sharing your wireless plan, today we’re introducing group repay—an easier way to split your Project Fi group plan bill. Each month, we’ll calculate participating members’ portion of the bill, send out payment reminders, and provide a simple way for members to repay plan owners directly through Project Fi.

Know what you owe—no math required

You shouldn’t have to pull out a calculator every month to figure out everyone’s share of the phone bill. There are many different ways to split the bill, but whatever you decide, Project Fi will do the math. Once you’ve selected the option that works best for you, Project Fi will automatically calculate the correct amount.


Easy setup, reminders, and payments

Any Project Fi plan owner or member can set up monthly repayment reminders with group repay. If you’re a plan owner, simply select a repayment amount for each member. When it’s time to pay the bill, Project Fi will send repayment notifications to group plan members.

Thanks to an integration with Google Wallet, sending and receiving payments is just as simple. Plan members can simply tap the notification and hit “Send Money” to complete the request. Owners can even cash out repayments automatically to a debit card or checking account.

One simple place to view, manage, and track payments

We know it’s hard to manage all of your monthly bills, so we’ll help you track your Project Fi payment history. With group repay, you can easily view your full payment history and payment statuses for the current month.

Getting started with group repay is easy. If you are currently on a Project Fi group plan, simply navigate to your account billing section to manage your settings. We're beginning to roll out this feature today, and it will be available to all Project Fi users by the end of the week.

Finally, for a limited time, when Project Fi plan owners add a new member to their group plan, both will receive a free month of Fi Basics. For more details, see our FAQ.

(1) Source: Google Consumer Survey, U.S. smartphone owners, May 2017 (n=500)


Group repay from Project Fi makes sharing a wireless plan easier than ever.
Categories: Technology

How to use BeyondCorp to ditch your VPN, improve security and go to the cloudHow to use BeyondCorp to ditch your VPN, improve security and go to the cloud

GoogleBlog - Tue, 06/20/2017 - 11:00

The BeyondCorp security engineering team at Google just announced their fourth research paper: Migrating to BeyondCorp: Maintaining Productivity While Improving Security.

For those that aren’t familiar with it, BeyondCorp is a security approach used by Google that allows employees to work from anywhere, quickly and easily.

This is easier said than done. In 2010, we undertook a massive project to rethink how to provide employees with secure remote access to applications: We moved away from our corporate VPN, and introduced BeyondCorp, a zero-trust network security model.

With BeyondCorp, we no longer have a binary access model, where you are either inside the whole corporate network, with all the access that allows, or outside and completely locked out of applications. Our new approach provides a better, more convenient, and less risky way: access to individual services as you need them, based on who you are and what machine you're using.

While BeyondCorp makes applications easily accessible from anywhere, it also improves security in other ways. Over the course of the migration we’ve discovered services that we thought were long dead, because this change required taking a detailed look at our traffic, our dependencies and our employee usage patterns. It’s also allowed us to scale globally while reducing our attack surface, and increased our ability to provide access when appropriate.

This March, we began offering elements of BeyondCorp to other organizations, in the form of Cloud Identity-Aware Proxy (IAP). Already, Cloud IAP has helped Google Cloud customers put fine-grained access controls on their critical internal services and applications based on region, time, role or group. More importantly, Cloud IAP removes obstacles to getting work done. Authorized employees get in, wherever they are, and do their job, or Cloud IAP blocks them, because they aren’t supposed to have access.

BeyondCorp: a work in progress

At Google, we’ve been on our BeyondCorp journey for several years, gradually shifting more of our traffic and services away from a segmented, privileged corporate network and onto the public internet and cloud.

You may be wondering how to move to a similar model. What do you need to do? What's the potential impact on your company and your employees?  The latest installment of our research paper describes how we kept people productive at Google while shifting our security model. It covers:

  • The process of migrating individuals to our non-privileged network

  • How we supported the effort through our TechStop infrastructure (local and remote service desks)

  • How to handle edge cases

  • Diagnostic tools to troubleshoot access denials

  • The importance of self-service documentation

  • Why to run a publicity campaign about the project.

In the end, we moved to this new system successfully by breaking up the work into discrete chunks, parallelizing as much as possible, and focusing on the end-user experience. To learn more about the BeyondCorp approach and determine whether it’s the right fit for your business, read all four public research papers:

  1. BeyondCorp: A New Approach to Enterprise Security

  2. BeyondCorp: Design to Deployment at Google

  3. Beyond Corp: The Access Proxy

  4. Migrating to BeyondCorp: Maintaining Productivity While Improving Security

And to discuss whether BeyondCorp and Cloud Identity-Aware Proxy are right for your business, give us a shout—we’d love to hear from you.

The BeyondCorp security engineering team at Google just announced their fourth research paper.
Categories: Technology

How to use BeyondCorp to ditch your VPN, improve security and go to the cloudHow to use BeyondCorp to ditch your VPN, improve security and go to the cloud

GoogleBlog - Tue, 06/20/2017 - 11:00

The BeyondCorp security engineering team at Google just announced their fourth research paper: Migrating to BeyondCorp: Maintaining Productivity While Improving Security.

For those that aren’t familiar with it, BeyondCorp is a security approach used by Google that allows employees to work from anywhere, quickly and easily.

This is easier said than done. In 2010, we undertook a massive project to rethink how to provide employees with secure remote access to applications: We moved away from our corporate VPN, and introduced BeyondCorp, a zero-trust network security model.

With BeyondCorp, we no longer have a binary access model, where you are either inside the whole corporate network, with all the access that allows, or outside and completely locked out of applications. Our new approach provides a better, more convenient, and less risky way: access to individual services as you need them, based on who you are and what machine you're using.

While BeyondCorp makes applications easily accessible from anywhere, it also improves security in other ways. Over the course of the migration we’ve discovered services that we thought were long dead, because this change required taking a detailed look at our traffic, our dependencies and our employee usage patterns. It’s also allowed us to scale globally while reducing our attack surface, and increased our ability to provide access when appropriate.

This March, we began offering elements of BeyondCorp to other organizations, in the form of Cloud Identity-Aware Proxy (IAP). Already, Cloud IAP has helped Google Cloud customers put fine-grained access controls on their critical internal services and applications based on region, time, role or group. More importantly, Cloud IAP removes obstacles to getting work done. Authorized employees get in, wherever they are, and do their job, or Cloud IAP blocks them, because they aren’t supposed to have access.

BeyondCorp: a work in progress

At Google, we’ve been on our BeyondCorp journey for several years, gradually shifting more of our traffic and services away from a segmented, privileged corporate network and onto the public internet and cloud.

You may be wondering how to move to a similar model. What do you need to do? What's the potential impact on your company and your employees?  The latest installment of our research paper describes how we kept people productive at Google while shifting our security model. It covers:

  • The process of migrating individuals to our non-privileged network

  • How we supported the effort through our TechStop infrastructure (local and remote service desks)

  • How to handle edge cases

  • Diagnostic tools to troubleshoot access denials

  • The importance of self-service documentation

  • Why to run a publicity campaign about the project.

In the end, we moved to this new system successfully by breaking up the work into discrete chunks, parallelizing as much as possible, and focusing on the end-user experience. To learn more about the BeyondCorp approach and determine whether it’s the right fit for your business, read all four public research papers:

  1. BeyondCorp: A New Approach to Enterprise Security

  2. BeyondCorp: Design to Deployment at Google

  3. Beyond Corp: The Access Proxy

  4. Migrating to BeyondCorp: Maintaining Productivity While Improving Security

And to discuss whether BeyondCorp and Cloud Identity-Aware Proxy are right for your business, give us a shout—we’d love to hear from you.

The BeyondCorp security engineering team at Google just announced their fourth research paper.
Categories: Technology

Delete All Locations in Toyota Nav System?

AskDaveTaylor - Tue, 06/20/2017 - 10:58

Yes, every vehicle that has a navigational system and can store addresses in memory has some way for you to delete them too. I’m more intrigued that you want to remove them all – it’s going to be quite a task to enter them all again. There’s no easy way to copy them all to a USB thumb drive and restore them later, unfortunately. Heck, there’s not even a way to just save them all so you can start with a printout of your previous favorites. I hope you’ve thought through your action: 75 locations is a lot of data entry later, whether you’re using a voice input or tapping on the GPS nav screen.

Still, there are other situations where what you ask makes complete sense. For example, perhaps it’s quite likely that this long term loan of your vehicle will turn into a purchase or, like me, you’re about to sell your Toyota vehicle and just want to wipe all the addresses and memory points from it prior to the new owner taking possession of the car. Or you just really love entering addresses!

Categories: Technology

Standing with refugees and nonprofits that serve them on World Refugee DayStanding with refugees and nonprofits that serve them on World Refugee Day

GoogleBlog - Tue, 06/20/2017 - 02:15

The Syrian civil war has created the biggest humanitarian crisis in our lifetime. More than 5 million people have been forced to leave behind family, possessions, school and work—basically their entire lives. But Syrians aren’t alone in fleeing violence and persecution. Global displacement is at an all-time high, and refugees from Somalia, Afghanistan, and other countries affected by conflict and violence are seeking sanctuary throughout the Middle East, Northern Africa, Europe and other parts of the world.

Since September 2015, we’ve been working with humanitarian organizations to respond to the refugee crisis. These organizations are experts in the field, and have told us where Google can fill a gap—with funding, technology or expertise. We’ve donated more than $20 million in Google.org grants to nonprofits, providing more than 800,000 refugees access to the internet, vital information and educational resources. On World Refugee Day, we want to share an update on a few of our ongoing initiatives.

From the start, our nonprofit grantees told us that connectivity and information are essential forms of aid. One of our early efforts was to help refugees and first responders in Greece get internet access. We provided a grant and a dozen Googler volunteers to NetHope, which has enabled them to install free Wi-Fi in 76 refugee camps. As a result, hundreds of thousands of refugees have been able to communicate with their loved ones through text and voice messages.

NetHope: Providing Internet access to refugees

We learned from the International Rescue Committee that clear and timely information is critical in a time of crisis. To help nonprofits quickly disseminate trustworthy information, we helped build Refugee.Info with IRC and Mercy Corps. Featuring information about the asylum process, translation tools and maps, the platform has become a vital resource for refugees in Greece and the Balkans. With the assistance of a new $1 million Google.org grant and technical volunteers from Google, IRC is now expanding the app to serve refugees in the Middle East.

Refugee.Info Hub: Providing vital information to refugees

The refugee journey is not only dangerous, but also long and frustrating; it interrupts careers, educations and dreams indefinitely. So a big focus of our support is on nonprofits that provide refugees access to educational resources while they’re in camps and once they’ve been resettled. We awarded a grant of $3 million grant to Queen Rania Foundation to help develop an online platform that provides access to educational resources for Arabic-speaking students and teachers across the Middle East and North Africa. And in Germany, libraries and nonprofits like AsylPlus are using Chromebooks from Project Reconnect to offer language learning and job-placement programs to more than 150,000 refugees to help them integrate into their new communities.  

In addition to directly serving refugees, our work with nonprofits has aimed to provide the global community with authentic and credible information about the crisis. Last month, we partnered with UNHCR to release Searching for Syria, a website with the goal of helping people everywhere better understand the Syrian refugee crisis through Google Trends data, personal stories and the rich information from the the UNHCR. We're also shedding light on refugees' experiences, like Maher’s, who came to the U.S. from Iraq. And today, IRC and YouTube are sharing real refugees’ stories captured by some of our top creators around the world. 

The effects of the refugee crisis will be felt for years, and no single organization can solve it on its own—it requires a team effort. Nonprofits providing support and creating opportunities for communities affected by crises need our help now more than ever, and we’ll continue to support these heroes to help them make an even bigger impact.

Since September 2015, we’ve been working with humanitarian organizations to respond to the refugee crisis. On World Refugee Day, we want to share an update on a few of our ongoing initiatives.
Categories: Technology

Standing with refugees and nonprofits that serve them on World Refugee DayStanding with refugees and nonprofits that serve them on World Refugee Day

GoogleBlog - Tue, 06/20/2017 - 02:15

The Syrian civil war has created the biggest humanitarian crisis in our lifetime. More than 5 million people have been forced to leave behind family, possessions, school and work—basically their entire lives. But Syrians aren’t alone in fleeing violence and persecution. Global displacement is at an all-time high, and refugees from Somalia, Afghanistan, and other countries affected by conflict and violence are seeking sanctuary throughout the Middle East, Northern Africa, Europe and other parts of the world.

Since September 2015, we’ve been working with humanitarian organizations to respond to the refugee crisis. These organizations are experts in the field, and have told us where Google can fill a gap—with funding, technology or expertise. We’ve donated more than $20 million in Google.org grants to nonprofits, providing more than 800,000 refugees access to the internet, vital information and educational resources. On World Refugee Day, we want to share an update on a few of our ongoing initiatives.

From the start, our nonprofit grantees told us that connectivity and information are essential forms of aid. One of our early efforts was to help refugees and first responders in Greece get internet access. We provided a grant and a dozen Googler volunteers to NetHope, which has enabled them to install free Wi-Fi in 76 refugee camps. As a result, hundreds of thousands of refugees have been able to communicate with their loved ones through text and voice messages.

NetHope: Providing Internet access to refugees

We learned from the International Rescue Committee that clear and timely information is critical in a time of crisis. To help nonprofits quickly disseminate trustworthy information, we helped build Refugee.Info with IRC and Mercy Corps. Featuring information about the asylum process, translation tools and maps, the platform has become a vital resource for refugees in Greece and the Balkans. With the assistance of a new $1 million Google.org grant and technical volunteers from Google, IRC is now expanding the app to serve refugees in the Middle East.

Refugee.Info Hub: Providing vital information to refugees

The refugee journey is not only dangerous, but also long and frustrating; it interrupts careers, educations and dreams indefinitely. So a big focus of our support is on nonprofits that provide refugees access to educational resources while they’re in camps and once they’ve been resettled. We awarded a grant of $3 million grant to Queen Rania Foundation to help develop an online platform that provides access to educational resources for Arabic-speaking students and teachers across the Middle East and North Africa. And in Germany, libraries and nonprofits like AsylPlus are using Chromebooks from Project Reconnect to offer language learning and job-placement programs to more than 150,000 refugees to help them integrate into their new communities.  

In addition to directly serving refugees, our work with nonprofits has aimed to provide the global community with authentic and credible information about the crisis. Last month, we partnered with UNHCR to release Searching for Syria, a website with the goal of helping people everywhere better understand the Syrian refugee crisis through Google Trends data, personal stories and the rich information from the the UNHCR. We're also shedding light on refugees' experiences, like Maher’s, who came to the U.S. from Iraq. And today, IRC and YouTube are sharing real refugees’ stories captured by some of our top creators around the world. 

The effects of the refugee crisis will be felt for years, and no single organization can solve it on its own—it requires a team effort. Nonprofits providing support and creating opportunities for communities affected by crises need our help now more than ever, and we’ll continue to support these heroes to help them make an even bigger impact.

Since September 2015, we’ve been working with humanitarian organizations to respond to the refugee crisis. On World Refugee Day, we want to share an update on a few of our ongoing initiatives.
Categories: Technology

Connecting more Americans with jobsConnecting more Americans with jobs

GoogleBlog - Tue, 06/20/2017 - 02:05

Whether you’re a student looking for a part-time job, an electrician seeking work closer to home, or a teacher moving to another state to be close to family, finding a job can be difficult. With job postings scattered across the web, newspapers and help wanted signs, it’s not always easy to find ones that are a good fit based on your unique needs and skills. As a result, many job seekers feel like they can’t find the job they’re looking for or apply to roles that aren’t the right fit. At the same time, 46 percent of U.S. employers face talent shortages and have issues filling open positions with the right candidate.

We have a long history of using our technology to connect people with crucial information. At I/O, we announced Google for Jobs, a company-wide initiative focused on helping both job seekers and employers, through deep collaboration with the job matching industry. This effort includes the Cloud Jobs API, announced last year, which provides access to Google’s machine learning capabilities to power smarter job search and recommendations within career sites, jobs boards, and other job matching sites and apps. Today, we’re taking the next step in the Google for Jobs initiative by putting the convenience and power of Search into the hands of job seekers. With this new experience, we aim to connect Americans to job opportunities across the U.S., so no matter who you are or what kind of job you’re looking for, you can find job postings that match your needs.

Starting today in English on desktop and mobile, when you search for “jobs near me,” “teaching jobs,” or similar job-seeking queries, you’ll see in-depth results that allow you to explore jobs from across the web. For many people, a job needs to satisfy some key criteria, like commute time, job specialties they've honed or the hours they have available to work. For many jobs, you’ll also see reviews and ratings of the employer from trusted sites, right alongside the job description, and if you’re signed in, for some jobs you’ll even see how long it would take to commute to the job from home. We’ll continue to add additional filters and information in the future. Looking for jobs is a personal and complex journey, and one that we’re trying to support in this new search experience.

Searching for a job can take time. And keeping up with new jobs that are posted throughout the day can be impossible. Now, if you step away from your job search, you can pick up right where you left off and stay in the loop on opportunities that interest you. Just turn on alerts for your search to receive an email notification whenever new jobs arrive, keeping you up-to-date and on top of your job hunt.

We’re working with a number of organizations from across the industry to bring you the most comprehensive listing of jobs—including LinkedIn, Monster, WayUp, DirectEmployers, CareerBuilder, Glassdoor and Facebook. This means you’ll see job postings from these sites and many others from across the web as soon as they’re posted. To ensure even more jobs are listed over time, we’re publishing open documentation for all jobs providers, from third-party platforms or direct employers, big or small, detailing how to make their job openings discoverable in this new feature.

People from all walks of life, experiences and backgrounds have undergone a job hunt at some point in their lives. Whether you’re a young adult looking for your first job, a veteran hoping to leverage your leadership experience in civilian life, or a parent looking for a job with better pay to support a growing family, we hope this new experience on Google will help make the job search simpler and more effective.

Today, as part of our Google for Jobs initiative, we are introducing a new feature in Search to help better connect people to job opportunities across the US.
Categories: Technology

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