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Twitter CEO Says Bitcoin Will Be the World's 'Single Currency' In 10 Years

Slashdot.org - Wed, 03/21/2018 - 21:05
In a recent interview with The Times, Twitter and Square CEO Jack Dorsey said he believes that bitcoin will become the world's single currency within 10 years. "The world ultimately will have a single currency, the internet will have a single currency," said Dorsey. "I personally believe that it will be bitcoin." Dorsey went on to say that the transition would happen "probably over ten years, but it could go faster." The Verge reports: That Dorsey is a fan of bitcoin isn't too surprising, though. In addition to serving as the CEO of Twitter, Dorsey is also the CEO of Square, which recently added the option to buy and sell Bitcoin directly from the Square Cash app. The company also released an illustrated children's story touting the benefits of the digital currency. As for Dorsey himself, he's gone on the record in an interview with The Verge's own Lauren Goode about the benefits of bitcoin as a currency, describing it as the "next big unlock" for the world of finance. (Dorsey owns an unspecified amount of the cryptocurrency.)

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Microsoft Promises Not to Sue Over GPLv2 Compliance Issues

LinuxToday.com - Wed, 03/21/2018 - 21:00

 itprotoday: This process for dealing with compliance issues is already hardwired into GPLv3 which was released in 2007, but Linux and other major projects continue to use GPLv2 which has no built-in provisions for dealing with such problems.

Categories: Linux

Project for Elmehdi T. -- 18/03/21 21:46:25 by dzjvban

Freelancer.com - Wed, 03/21/2018 - 20:46
I need you to create a 2 way messaging demo (Budget: $180 USD, Jobs: AJAX, Hire me, Javascript, Linux, PHP, WordPress)
Categories: Freelance, Linux

Google Is Buying Innovative Camera Startup Lytro For $40 Million

Slashdot.org - Wed, 03/21/2018 - 20:25
According to TechCrunch, Google is acquiring Lytro, the imaging startup that began as a ground-breaking camera company for consumers before pivoting to use its depth-data, light-field technology in VR. From the report: One source described the deal as an "asset sale" with Lytro going for no more than $40 million. Another source said the price was even lower: $25 million and that it was shopped around -- to Facebook, according to one source; and possibly to Apple, according to another. A separate person told us that not all employees are coming over with the company's technology: some have already received severance and parted ways with the company, and others have simply left. Assets would presumably also include Lytro's 59 patents related to light-field and other digital imaging technology. The sale would be far from a big win for Lytro and its backers. The startup has raised just over $200 million in funding and was valued at around $360 million after its last round in 2017, according to data from PitchBook. Its long list of investors include Andreessen Horowitz, Foxconn, GSV, Greylock, NEA, Qualcomm Ventures and many more. Rick Osterloh, SVP of hardware at Google, sits on Lytro's board. A pricetag of $40 million is not quite the exit that was envisioned for the company when it first launched its camera concept, and in the words of investor Ben Horowitz, "blew my brains to bits."

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The Ataribox is here at GDC, but it's also kind of not (hands-on) - CNET

Linux News - Wed, 03/21/2018 - 20:07


The Ataribox is here at GDC, but it's also kind of not (hands-on)
Since the Atari VCS is basically an Ubuntu Linux computer, it may also be able to play games distributed on the Linux version of Steam -- though Atari says it doesn't yet know how well games like Borderlands 2 for Linux might run. While Atari's ...
GDC 2018 | The Ataribox is real, and it's more computer than gaming consoleNotebookcheck.net (press release)
Mysterious 'Ataribox' console finally gets a name and pre-order windowDigital Trends

all 13 news articles »
Categories: Linux

Russia Secretly Helped Venezuela Launch a Cryptocurrency To Evade US Sanctions

Slashdot.org - Wed, 03/21/2018 - 19:45
According to an exclusive report by Time, Russia helped Venezuelan officials create the world's first state-backed cryptocurrency to skirt U.S. sanctions. The cryptocurrency was launched in late February and was banned by the Trump administration earlier this week. From the report: The new cryptocurrency, a form of digital cash that is supposedly linked to the value of Venezuela's oil reserves, was launched on Feb. 20 during a ceremony in the presidential palace in Caracas. Nicolas Maduro, the socialist leader of Venezuela, declared that it would serve as a kind of "kryptonite" against the power of the U.S government, which he sarcastically referred to as "Superman." Sitting in the front row at that ceremony were two of Maduro's Russian advisers, Denis Druzhkov and Fyodor Bogorodsky, whom the President thanked for aiding his fight against American "imperialism." Both men have ties to major Russian banks and billionaires close to the Kremlin. But they were not the most senior Russians involved. According to an executive at a Russian state bank who deals with cryptocurrencies, senior advisers to the Kremlin have overseen the effort in Venezuela, and President Vladimir Putin signed off on it last year. "People close to Putin, they told him this is how to avoid the sanctions," says the executive, who spoke to TIME on condition of anonymity. "This is how the whole thing started."

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Need help with Virtualbox and Ubuntu by bahadrztrk

Freelancer.com - Wed, 03/21/2018 - 19:18
I'm trying to build a system including vbox and ubuntu let me know if ur capable of. (Budget: $30 - $250 USD, Jobs: Linux, Network Administration, Shell Script, Ubuntu, UNIX)
Categories: Freelance, Linux

Introducing the LineageSDK for developers

OSNews.com - Wed, 03/21/2018 - 19:04
LineageOS is an operating system for everyone: from the average user to the advanced developer. While users have a giant playground in their hands with many customization options, we also want to make LineageOS a fun place for developers. The standards for official builds help ensure developers that their app will not end up in a bad state because of inappropriate Android API changes or broken hardware support, but this is not enough for us; we're announcing some new APIs that will allow your apps to do more when they're running on a LineageOS-powered device. The Lineage platform SDK (LineageSDK for short) is a powerful resource that allows us to both keep our features out of the core Android frameworks (for better security and easier bringup processes) and expose some extra functionality to app developers. We'll have to wait and see if developers are willing to add some code to their Android applications for the features in this SDK.

Police Release First Video From Inside the Uber Self-Driving Car That Killed a Pedestrian

Slashdot.org - Wed, 03/21/2018 - 19:03
An anonymous reader quotes a report from Recode: Three days after an Uber self-driving vehicle fatally crashed into a pedestrian in Tempe, Ariz., police have released video footage of what the vehicle saw with its cameras moments before running the woman over, and what happened inside the vehicle, where an operator was at the wheel. The video footage does not conclusively show who is at fault. However, it seems to confirm initial reports from the Tempe police that Herzberg appeared suddenly. It also showed the vehicle operator behind the wheel intermittently looking down while the car was driving itself.

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Zuckerberg: Cambridge Analytica leak a "breach of trust"

OSNews.com - Wed, 03/21/2018 - 18:54
After days of silence, Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg has responded to the controversy over the 2014 leak of private Facebook user data to a firm that went on to do political consulting work for the Donald Trump campaign in 2016. Cambridge Analytica got the data by paying a psychology professor, Aleksandr Kogan, to create a Facebook personality quiz that harvested data not only about its own users but also about users' friends. Kogan amassed data from around 50 million users and turned it over to Cambridge. Zuckerberg says that when Facebook learned about this transfer in 2015, it got Kogan and Cambridge to certify that they had deleted the data. But media reports this weekend suggested that Cambridge had lied and retained the data throughout the 2016 presidential campaign. This whole thing should make everyone think twice about how - and if - they should keep using Facebook. I've personally always been incredibly careful about what data I put on Facebook and I've rarely - if ever - used any Facebook 'apps', but in the end, you don't even need to feed Facebook any data for them to figure out who you are and what you're interested in. It's actually remarkably easy to extrapolate a whole lot about you from simple things like the times you're online, or which sites with Facebook social trackers you visit, and so on. I trust Google with such forms of data, but not Facebook. If it wasn't for my friends, I'd delete my Facebook account in a heartbeat. My hope is that this story - which has certainly permeated beyond tech media into the mainstream media - will push more and more of the people around me to consider leaving Facebook.

Ask Slashdot: Were Developments In Technology More Exciting 30 Years Ago?

Slashdot.org - Wed, 03/21/2018 - 18:20
dryriver writes: We live in a time where mainstream media, websites, blogs, social media accounts, your barely computer literate next door neighbor and so forth frequently rave about the "innovation" that is happening everywhere. But as someone who experienced developments in technology back in the 1980s and 1990s, in computing in particular, I cannot shake the feeling that, somehow, the "deep nerds" who were innovating back then did it better and with more heartfelt passion than I can feel today. Of course, tech from 30 years ago seems a bit primitive compared to today -- computer gear is faster and sleeker nowadays. But it seems that the core techniques and core concepts used in much of what is called "innovation" today were invented for the first time one-after-the-other back then, and going back as far as the 1950s maybe. I get the impression that much of what makes billions in profits today and wows everyone is mere improvements on what was actually invented and trail blazed for the first time, 2, 3, 4, 5 or more decades ago. Is there much genuine "inventing" and "innovating" going on today, or are tech companies essentially repackaging the R&D and knowhow that was brought into the world decades ago by long-forgotten deep nerds into sleeker, sexier 21st century tech gadgets? Is Alexa, Siri, the Xbox, Oculus Rift or iPhone truly what could be considered "amazing technology," or should we have bigger and badder tech and innovation in the year 2018?

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

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