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Everything You Need to Know About Optimizing Your Wi-Fi in One Video

LifeHacker.com - Tue, 04/22/2014 - 17:00

Getting crappy Wi-Fi reception on one side of your house? This video details a number of ways to boost your reception, both simple and complex—in only 5 minutes.

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Categories: Hacks

Easter egg: DSL router patch merely hides backdoor instead of closing it

LinuxToday.com - Tue, 04/22/2014 - 17:00

Ars Technica: First, DSL router owners got an unwelcome Christmas present. Now, the same gift is back as an Easter egg.

Categories: Linux

Apple opens OS X Beta Seed Program for everyone

OSNews.com - Tue, 04/22/2014 - 16:33
Join the OS X Beta Seed Program and help make OS X even better. Install the latest pre-release software, try it out, and submit your feedback. Apple opens its OS X beta program to everyone. Interesting move.

What's Next Collects Together Coding Resources, Projects, and More

LifeHacker.com - Tue, 04/22/2014 - 16:30

You've got a ton of options for learning how to code , but if you're looking for a bit of direction, What's Next is a resource that collects together resources for beginners and experts, popular projects, and a list of interview questions you should have answers for.

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Categories: Hacks

Next-Gen Thunderbolt: Twice as Fast, But a Different Connector

Slashdot.org - Tue, 04/22/2014 - 16:12
Details have leaked about the next iteration of Intel's Thunderbolt connector. The good news: bandwidth will double, going up to about 40Gbps from its current 20. Power usage will drop by half, and it'll support PCI-e 3.0. The bad news: it uses a redesigned connector, and will rely on adapters for backward compatibility. From the article: "Doubling the available bandwidth will enable next-generation Thunderbolt controllers to drive two 4K displays simultaneously, where current controllers can only drive one. The new controllers will allegedly be compatible with a variety of other protocols as well, including DisplayPort 1.2, USB 3.0, and HDMI 2.0. Intel will offer two different versions of the controller—a version that uses four PCI Express lanes to drive two Thunderbolt ports and an "LP" (presumably "Low Power") version that uses two PCI Express lanes to drive one port."

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








The Biggest Myths About Cutting the Cable Cord

LifeHacker.com - Tue, 04/22/2014 - 16:00

If the headlines are to be believed, consumers are abandoning traditional TV subscriptions in droves, embracing ever-easier-to-use streaming gadgets and apps, and watching their favorite shows mere minutes after they hit the usual airwaves. But the truth is actually a lot more complicated.

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Categories: Hacks

After Heartbleed, OpenSSL Is Forked Into LibreSSL

LinuxToday.com - Tue, 04/22/2014 - 16:00

eWEEK: In open-source, when things go wrong, forks happen.

Categories: Linux

Apple Opens Up OS X Beta Testing to All Users

LifeHacker.com - Tue, 04/22/2014 - 15:38

If you're curious about new features coming to OS X Mavericks, Apple has opened up the beta testing to anyone with an Apple ID so you can now download the latest builds without a developer account.

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Categories: Hacks

1Password Redesigned for iOS 7, Adds Multiple Vault Support, and More

LifeHacker.com - Tue, 04/22/2014 - 15:30

iOS: The password manager 1Password got a big overhaul today, including a whole new design for iOS 7, quick switching between password vaults, a new browser, and more.

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Categories: Hacks

Apple Fixes Major SSL Bug In OS X, iOS

Slashdot.org - Tue, 04/22/2014 - 15:30
Trailrunner7 writes: "Apple has fixed a serious security flaw present in many versions of both iOS and OS X and could allow an attacker to intercept data on SSL connections. The bug is one of many the company fixed Tuesday in its two main operating systems, and several of the other vulnerabilities have serious consequences as well, including the ability to bypass memory protections and run arbitrary code. The most severe of the vulnerabilities patched in iOS 7.1.1 and OSX Mountain Lion and Mavericks is an issue with the secure transport component of the operating systems. If an attacker was in a man-in-the-middle position on a user's network, he might be able to intercept supposedly secure traffic or change the connection's properties."

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








HandBrake server (handbrake_cli) by Alberthaff

Freelancer.com - Tue, 04/22/2014 - 15:13
I need a simple bash-script, that will continue to ask for jobs until it gets a job. Once it has finished the current job, it must start to ask for jobs again. Once every 15 seconds. The script will receive jobs by requesting an XML-file from my server... (Budget: €8-€30 EUR, Jobs: Linux, XML)
Categories: Freelance, Linux

Do You Spring Clean?

LifeHacker.com - Tue, 04/22/2014 - 15:00

Spring cleaning has always been a ritual we've all been told to do. But we want to know, do you actually set aside time for spring cleaning?

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Categories: Hacks

Red Hat, Ubuntu, and Docker: Container virtualization goes mainstream

LinuxToday.com - Tue, 04/22/2014 - 15:00

ZDNet: Red Hat and Ubuntu are Linux rivals and they disagree on many technical details, but they do agree on one thing: Docker.

Categories: Linux

Introducing our global Google+ page for webmasters

GoogleWebmasterCentral - Tue, 04/22/2014 - 14:55
Webmaster Level: All

We’ve recently launched our global Google Webmasters Google+ page. Have you checked it out yet? Our page covers a plethora of topics:
Follow us at google.com/+GoogleWebmasters and let us know in the comments what else you’d like to see on our page! If you speak Italian, Japanese, Russian or Spanish, be sure to also join one of our webmaster communities to stay up-to-date on language and region-specific news.

Hello from around the world!Posted by Mary Chen and Andrey Lipattsev, Webmaster Outreach Team
Categories: Web

NIST Removes Dual_EC_DRBG From Random Number Generator Recommendations

Slashdot.org - Tue, 04/22/2014 - 14:49
hypnosec writes: "National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) has removed the much-criticized Dual_EC_DRBG (Dual Elliptic Curve Deterministic Random Bit Generator) from its draft guidance on random number generators following a period of public comment and review. The revised document retains three of the four previously available options for generating pseudorandom bits required to create secure cryptographic keys for encrypting data. NIST recommends that people using Dual_EC_DRBG should transition to one of the other three recommended algorithms as quickly as possible."

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








NIST Removes Dual_EC_DRBG From Random Number Generator Recommendations

Slashdot.org - Tue, 04/22/2014 - 14:49
hypnosec writes: "National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) has removed the much-criticized Dual_EC_DRBG (Dual Elliptic Curve Deterministic Random Bit Generator) from its draft guidance on random number generators following a period of public comment and review. The revised document retains three of the four previously available options for generating pseudorandom bits required to create secure cryptographic keys for encrypting data. NIST recommends that people using Dual_EC_DRBG should transition to one of the other three recommended algorithms as quickly as possible."

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








NIST Removes Dual_EC_DRBG From Random Number Generator Recommendations

Slashdot.org - Tue, 04/22/2014 - 14:49
hypnosec writes: "National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) has removed the much-criticized Dual_EC_DRBG (Dual Elliptic Curve Deterministic Random Bit Generator) from its draft guidance on random number generators following a period of public comment and review. The revised document retains three of the four previously available options for generating pseudorandom bits required to create secure cryptographic keys for encrypting data. NIST recommends that people using Dual_EC_DRBG should transition to one of the other three recommended algorithms as quickly as possible."

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








NIST Removes Dual_EC_DRBG From Random Number Generator Recommendations

Slashdot.org - Tue, 04/22/2014 - 14:49
hypnosec writes: "National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) has removed the much-criticized Dual_EC_DRBG (Dual Elliptic Curve Deterministic Random Bit Generator) from its draft guidance on random number generators following a period of public comment and review. The revised document retains three of the four previously available options for generating pseudorandom bits required to create secure cryptographic keys for encrypting data. NIST recommends that people using Dual_EC_DRBG should transition to one of the other three recommended algorithms as quickly as possible."

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








NIST Removes Dual_EC_DRBG From Random Number Generator Recommendations

Slashdot.org - Tue, 04/22/2014 - 14:49
hypnosec writes: "National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) has removed the much-criticized Dual_EC_DRBG (Dual Elliptic Curve Deterministic Random Bit Generator) from its draft guidance on random number generators following a period of public comment and review. The revised document retains three of the four previously available options for generating pseudorandom bits required to create secure cryptographic keys for encrypting data. NIST recommends that people using Dual_EC_DRBG should transition to one of the other three recommended algorithms as quickly as possible."

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








NIST Removes Dual_EC_DRBG From Random Number Generator Recommendations

Slashdot.org - Tue, 04/22/2014 - 14:49
hypnosec writes: "National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) has removed the much-criticized Dual_EC_DRBG (Dual Elliptic Curve Deterministic Random Bit Generator) from its draft guidance on random number generators following a period of public comment and review. The revised document retains three of the four previously available options for generating pseudorandom bits required to create secure cryptographic keys for encrypting data. NIST recommends that people using Dual_EC_DRBG should transition to one of the other three recommended algorithms as quickly as possible."

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








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