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Was Microsoft Forced To Pay $136M In Back Taxes In China?

Slashdot.org - Wed, 11/26/2014 - 14:42
itwbennett writes China's state-controlled Xinhua News Agency said on Sunday that an unnamed international company was forced to pay 840 million yuan ($136 million) in back taxes, as part of a Chinese government crackdown on tax evasion. The Xinhua article simply referred to it as the "M company," describing it as a top 500 global firm headquartered in the U.S. that in 1995 set up a wholly owned foreign subsidiary in Beijing. The details match Microsoft's own background, and no other company obviously fits the bill. Xinhua added, that despite the company's strengths, its subsidiary in China had not been not making a profit, and posted a loss of over $2 billion during a six-year period.

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How Long Will I Be Stuck in This Airport? A Thanksgiving Travel Forecast

LifeHacker.com - Wed, 11/26/2014 - 14:41

If you're one of the tens of thousands of people who are trapped in one of the United States' many fine airports on this Thanksgiving Eve, you may find yourself wondering when the hell you're going to get out of here and on to your destination. Here's a quick forecast for your (eventual) departure.

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Categories: Hacks

Music Center Adds Your Music Library to Notification Center

LifeHacker.com - Wed, 11/26/2014 - 14:30

iOS: Music Center is a widget for iOS 8 that lets you browse your entire music library from the Notification Center. Once it's enabled, you can start playing music without having to open and browse through the Music app.

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Categories: Hacks

Pear OS Linux Concept Revived as Pearl Linux 1.0 - Screenshot Tour

LinuxToday.com - Wed, 11/26/2014 - 14:00

 softpedia: Pear OS Linux was a very successful Linux distribution based on Ubuntu that wanted to provide an experience similar to Mac OS X.

Categories: Linux

What's The Best Custom PC Builder? 

LifeHacker.com - Wed, 11/26/2014 - 14:00

Building your own computer is one of the most fun and personal projects you can take on. We've shown you how , and offered up specific builds to get you started . But if you don't have the time or inclination, there are custom, boutique PC builders who'll put together a high-powered rig for you, for the right price. This week we want to know which ones are the best.

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Categories: Hacks

Clarificiation on the IP Address Security in Dropbox Case

Slashdot.org - Wed, 11/26/2014 - 13:59
Bennett Haselton writes A judge rules that a county has to turn over the IP addresses that were used to access a county mayor's Dropbox account, stating that there is no valid security-related reason why the IP addresses should be exempt from a public records request. I think the judge's conclusion about IP addresses was right, but the reasoning was flawed; here is a technically more correct argument that would have led to the same answer. Keep Reading to see what Bennett has to say about the case.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Steam's Holiday Sale is Live Now Through December 2nd

LifeHacker.com - Wed, 11/26/2014 - 13:36

Like clockwork, Valve launches a big holiday sale and 2014's has just begun. Top deals right now include Watch Dogs, Goat Simulator, and The Evil Within. With more sure to come.

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Categories: Hacks

Have More Meaningful Conversations to Avoid Burning Your Bridges

LifeHacker.com - Wed, 11/26/2014 - 13:30

You've probably heard the saying before, "don't burn your bridges before you cross them." Usually it's a caution against doing things like suddenly quitting while telling your boss what you really think of him. Sales professional Tom Powers writes on LinkedIn that "burning bridges" is more often a slow burn, one that happens in small ways over time.

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Categories: Hacks

WaveNET – the Floating, Flexible Wave Energy Generator

Slashdot.org - Wed, 11/26/2014 - 13:15
Zothecula writes: Scotland's Albatern is putting a new, modular spin on renewable energy generation. WaveNET is a scalable array of floating "Squid" generator units that harvest wave energy as their buoyant arms rise and fall with the motion of the waves. Each Squid can link up to as many as three others, effectively creating a large, floating grid that's flexible in every direction. The bigger this grid gets, the more efficient it becomes at harvesting energy, and the more different wave movements it can extract energy from. Albatern's 10-year target is to have 1.25 kilometer-long floating energy farms pumping out as much as 100 megawatts by 2024.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








How to configure an NFS server and mount NFS shares on Ubuntu 14.10

HowtoForge.com - Wed, 11/26/2014 - 13:10

How to configure an NFS server and mount NFS shares on Ubuntu 14.10

This guide explains how to configure an NFS server in Ubuntu 14.10 Network File System (NFS) is a popular distributed filesystem protocol that enables users to mount remote directories on their server. The system lets you leverage storage space in a different location and write onto the same space from multiple servers in an effortless manner. It, thus, works fairly well for directories that users need to access frequently. This tutorial explains the process of mounting NFS share on an Ubuntu 14.10 server in an simple and easy-to-follow steps.

Categories: Linux

LinEnum – Linux Enumeration & Privilege Escalation Tool

LinuxToday.com - Wed, 11/26/2014 - 13:00

darknet: LinEnum will automate many Local Linux Enumeration & Privilege Escalation checks

Categories: Linux

The Limefuel Rugged Keeps Your Gear Charged, Can Take a Beating

LifeHacker.com - Wed, 11/26/2014 - 13:00

Battery packs are easy to come by, but what's a bit more difficult to find is a battery pack that'll keep your gear charged, charge it completely if it's low on battery, and still be sturdy and well-built enough to go with you anywhere—and we mean anywhere. The Limefuel Rugged fits the bill perfectly. Here's why.

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Categories: Hacks

$8 ShopRunner, the Best Travel Mug, and More Early Black Friday Deals

LifeHacker.com - Wed, 11/26/2014 - 12:45

ShopRunner is like Amazon Prime shipping, but for over 100 other online stores (including Newegg, Domino's, TigerDirect, and a bunch of clothing retailers). A subscription normally costs $79 for year, but today you can get it for $8. Yes, really. [One-Year ShopRunner Membership, $8 with code 15THANKS]

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Categories: Hacks

Auto Industry Teams Up With Military To Stop Car Hacking

Slashdot.org - Wed, 11/26/2014 - 12:32
An anonymous reader writes: A team of hackers is collaborating with military and industry groups to develop cyber security defenses for commercially available cars, in response to a growing threat from criminals and terrorists. In the U.K., hackers are now responsible for a third of car thefts in London and there are fears that while technology is progressing, older models will remain vulnerable to attack. Although there have been no reported instances of a car being completely commandeered outside of controlled conditions, during tests hackers come out on top every time – unlocking car boots, setting off windscreen wipers, locking brakes, and cutting the engine.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








How Much You Should Have Saved in Your Retirement Account, by Age

LifeHacker.com - Wed, 11/26/2014 - 12:30

Many of us set aside a portion of our income, such as 15% or more , for retirement and call it a day. That might be great if you have 30 years left to save, but what if you're just catching up to saving for retirement now or you've started saving much earlier? Fidelity's age-based savings milestones offer one way to see if you're on track.

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Categories: Hacks

What’s the Difference Between Chromium and Chrome?

LinuxToday.com - Wed, 11/26/2014 - 12:00

HowToGeek: Chromium is the open-source project that forms the basis for Google Chrome.

Categories: Linux

Hacker Threatened With 44 Felony Charges Escapes With Misdemeanor

Slashdot.org - Wed, 11/26/2014 - 11:50
An anonymous reader writes: It's no secret that prosecutors usually throw every charge they can at an alleged criminal, but the case of Aaron Swartz brought to light how poorly-written computer abuse laws lend themselves to this practice. Now, another perfect example has resolved itself: a hacker with ties to Anonymous was recently threatened with 44 felony counts of computer fraud and cyberstalking, each with its own 10-year maximum sentence. If the charges stuck, the man was facing multiple lifetimes worth of imprisonment. But, of course, they didn't. Prosecutors struck a deal to get him to plead guilty to a single misdemeanor charge, which carried only a $10,000 fine. The man's attorney, Tor Eklund, said, "The more I looked at this, the more it seemed like an archetypal example of the Department of Justice's prosecutorial abuse when it comes to computer crime. It shows how aggressive they are, and how they seek to destroy your reputation in the press even when the charges are complete, fricking garbage."

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Hacker Threatened With 44 Felony Charges Escapes With Misdemeanor

Slashdot.org - Wed, 11/26/2014 - 11:50
An anonymous reader writes: It's no secret that prosecutors usually throw every charge they can at an alleged criminal, but the case of Aaron Swartz brought to light how poorly-written computer abuse laws lend themselves to this practice. Now, another perfect example has resolved itself: a hacker with ties to Anonymous was recently threatened with 44 felony counts of computer fraud and cyberstalking, each with its own 10-year maximum sentence. If the charges stuck, the man was facing multiple lifetimes worth of imprisonment. But, of course, they didn't. Prosecutors struck a deal to get him to plead guilty to a single misdemeanor charge, which carried only a $10,000 fine. The man's attorney, Tor Eklund, said, "The more I looked at this, the more it seemed like an archetypal example of the Department of Justice's prosecutorial abuse when it comes to computer crime. It shows how aggressive they are, and how they seek to destroy your reputation in the press even when the charges are complete, fricking garbage."

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Hacker Threatened With 44 Felony Charges Escapes With Misdemeanor

Slashdot.org - Wed, 11/26/2014 - 11:50
An anonymous reader writes: It's no secret that prosecutors usually throw every charge they can at an alleged criminal, but the case of Aaron Swartz brought to light how poorly-written computer abuse laws lend themselves to this practice. Now, another perfect example has resolved itself: a hacker with ties to Anonymous was recently threatened with 44 felony counts of computer fraud and cyberstalking, each with its own 10-year maximum sentence. If the charges stuck, the man was facing multiple lifetimes worth of imprisonment. But, of course, they didn't. Prosecutors struck a deal to get him to plead guilty to a single misdemeanor charge, which carried only a $10,000 fine. The man's attorney, Tor Eklund, said, "The more I looked at this, the more it seemed like an archetypal example of the Department of Justice's prosecutorial abuse when it comes to computer crime. It shows how aggressive they are, and how they seek to destroy your reputation in the press even when the charges are complete, fricking garbage."

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Hacker Threatened With 44 Felony Charges Escapes With Misdemeanor

Slashdot.org - Wed, 11/26/2014 - 11:50
An anonymous reader writes: It's no secret that prosecutors usually throw every charge they can at an alleged criminal, but the case of Aaron Swartz brought to light how poorly-written computer abuse laws lend themselves to this practice. Now, another perfect example has resolved itself: a hacker with ties to Anonymous was recently threatened with 44 felony counts of computer fraud and cyberstalking, each with its own 10-year maximum sentence. If the charges stuck, the man was facing multiple lifetimes worth of imprisonment. But, of course, they didn't. Prosecutors struck a deal to get him to plead guilty to a single misdemeanor charge, which carried only a $10,000 fine. The man's attorney, Tor Eklund, said, "The more I looked at this, the more it seemed like an archetypal example of the Department of Justice's prosecutorial abuse when it comes to computer crime. It shows how aggressive they are, and how they seek to destroy your reputation in the press even when the charges are complete, fricking garbage."

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








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