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New Micro-Ring Resonator Creates Quantum Entanglement On a Silicon Chip

Slashdot.org - Wed, 01/28/2015 - 12:27
Zothecula writes: The quantum entanglement of particles, such as photons, is a prerequisite for the new and future technologies of quantum computing, telecommunications, and cyber security. Real-world applications that take advantage of this technology, however, will not be fully realized until devices that produce such quantum states leave the realms of the laboratory and are made both small and energy efficient enough to be embedded in electronic equipment. In this vein, European scientists (abstract) have created and installed a tiny "ring-resonator" on a microchip that is claimed to produce copious numbers of entangled photons while using very little power to do so.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








New Micro-Ring Resonator Creates Quantum Entanglement On a Silicon Chip

Slashdot.org - Wed, 01/28/2015 - 12:27
Zothecula writes: The quantum entanglement of particles, such as photons, is a prerequisite for the new and future technologies of quantum computing, telecommunications, and cyber security. Real-world applications that take advantage of this technology, however, will not be fully realized until devices that produce such quantum states leave the realms of the laboratory and are made both small and energy efficient enough to be embedded in electronic equipment. In this vein, European scientists (abstract) have created and installed a tiny "ring-resonator" on a microchip that is claimed to produce copious numbers of entangled photons while using very little power to do so.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








New Micro-Ring Resonator Creates Quantum Entanglement On a Silicon Chip

Slashdot.org - Wed, 01/28/2015 - 12:27
Zothecula writes: The quantum entanglement of particles, such as photons, is a prerequisite for the new and future technologies of quantum computing, telecommunications, and cyber security. Real-world applications that take advantage of this technology, however, will not be fully realized until devices that produce such quantum states leave the realms of the laboratory and are made both small and energy efficient enough to be embedded in electronic equipment. In this vein, European scientists (abstract) have created and installed a tiny "ring-resonator" on a microchip that is claimed to produce copious numbers of entangled photons while using very little power to do so.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








New Micro-Ring Resonator Creates Quantum Entanglement On a Silicon Chip

Slashdot.org - Wed, 01/28/2015 - 12:27
Zothecula writes: The quantum entanglement of particles, such as photons, is a prerequisite for the new and future technologies of quantum computing, telecommunications, and cyber security. Real-world applications that take advantage of this technology, however, will not be fully realized until devices that produce such quantum states leave the realms of the laboratory and are made both small and energy efficient enough to be embedded in electronic equipment. In this vein, European scientists (abstract) have created and installed a tiny "ring-resonator" on a microchip that is claimed to produce copious numbers of entangled photons while using very little power to do so.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








New Micro-Ring Resonator Creates Quantum Entanglement On a Silicon Chip

Slashdot.org - Wed, 01/28/2015 - 12:27
Zothecula writes: The quantum entanglement of particles, such as photons, is a prerequisite for the new and future technologies of quantum computing, telecommunications, and cyber security. Real-world applications that take advantage of this technology, however, will not be fully realized until devices that produce such quantum states leave the realms of the laboratory and are made both small and energy efficient enough to be embedded in electronic equipment. In this vein, European scientists (abstract) have created and installed a tiny "ring-resonator" on a microchip that is claimed to produce copious numbers of entangled photons while using very little power to do so.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








New Micro-Ring Resonator Creates Quantum Entanglement On a Silicon Chip

Slashdot.org - Wed, 01/28/2015 - 12:27
Zothecula writes: The quantum entanglement of particles, such as photons, is a prerequisite for the new and future technologies of quantum computing, telecommunications, and cyber security. Real-world applications that take advantage of this technology, however, will not be fully realized until devices that produce such quantum states leave the realms of the laboratory and are made both small and energy efficient enough to be embedded in electronic equipment. In this vein, European scientists (abstract) have created and installed a tiny "ring-resonator" on a microchip that is claimed to produce copious numbers of entangled photons while using very little power to do so.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








VMware OpenStack Customers Growing Faster than Overall Business

ServerWatch - Wed, 01/28/2015 - 12:01

VMware reports 2014 revenue of $6.04 billion and has big plans to grow the business in 2015.

Categories: Linux

How To Patch and Protect Linux Server Against the Glibc GHOST Vulnerability # CVE-2015-0235

LinuxToday.com - Wed, 01/28/2015 - 12:00

Nixcraft: How do I verify that my server has been fixed against the Glibc GHOST vulnerability?

Categories: Linux

Why Screen Lockers On X11 Cannot Be Secure

Linux.Slashdot.org - Wed, 01/28/2015 - 11:46
jones_supa writes: One thing we all remember from Windows NT is the security feature requiring the user to press CTRL-ALT-DEL to unlock the workstation (this can still be enabled with a policy setting). The motivation was to make it impossible for other programs to mimic a lock screen, as they couldn't react to the special key combination. Martin Gräßlin from the KDE team takes a look at the lock screen security on X11. On a protocol level, X11 doesn't know anything of screen lockers. Also the X server doesn't know that the screen is locked as it doesn't understand the concept. This means the screen locker can only use the core functionality available to emulate screen locking. That in turn also means that any other client can do the same and prevent the screen locker from working (for example opening a context menu on any window prevents the screen locker from activating). That's quite a bummer: any process connected to the X server can block the screen locker, and even more it could fake your screen locker.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Categories: Linux

Why Screen Lockers On X11 Cannot Be Secure

Slashdot.org - Wed, 01/28/2015 - 11:46
jones_supa writes: One thing we all remember from Windows NT is the security feature requiring the user to press CTRL-ALT-DEL to unlock the workstation (this can still be enabled with a policy setting). The motivation was to make it impossible for other programs to mimic a lock screen, as they couldn't react to the special key combination. Martin Gräßlin from the KDE team takes a look at the lock screen security on X11. On a protocol level, X11 doesn't know anything of screen lockers. Also the X server doesn't know that the screen is locked as it doesn't understand the concept. This means the screen locker can only use the core functionality available to emulate screen locking. That in turn also means that any other client can do the same and prevent the screen locker from working (for example opening a context menu on any window prevents the screen locker from activating). That's quite a bummer: any process connected to the X server can block the screen locker, and even more it could fake your screen locker.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Linux Mail Server by anonguest

Freelancer.com - Wed, 01/28/2015 - 11:44
I need a mass email server set up on my Linux based desktop (Budget: $30-$250 USD, Jobs: Linux)
Categories: Freelance, Linux

Can’t create new folders in Yahoo Mail?

AskDaveTaylor - Wed, 01/28/2015 - 11:41

You’re not the first person to report that you’re having problems with the task of creating a new folder in Yahoo Mail. In fact, complaints go back over two years for people who are using the “new” interface (of course at this point it’s not really new) and finding that the new folder button doesn’t do anything. Heck, I bumped into this problem myself writing up this tutorial.

The problem appears to be one of layers in the fancy HTML that Yahoo is using for its new Yahoo Mail interface, which means that it’s kinda hard for you as a user to fix. There are actually three different ways to create a new folder, however, so let’s step through the options before you get too frustrated.

The first and most obvious is the secret button that’s on the left menu:

Can’t see the “new folder” option? I did say it’s secret, right?

Move your cursor over “Folders” and it shows up:

There it is!

Click on it to create a new folder:

If you don’t see that window pop up in the middle of your screen, what I found worked was to click on “Folders” to have it hide all the subfolders. Then I could click and create a new folder easily enough.

Still not working? Find a message, any message, then click on “Move” along the top:

The last choice is “New Folder”. Choose that.

Or, if you’re really feeling bold, try the key sequence suggested: “D” then “Control+Shift+E”. I couldn’t get the latter to work at all on my Win 8.1 system running Chrome but perhaps you’ll have better luck.

And if none of those options work, well, there’s always Gmail.

The post Can’t create new folders in Yahoo Mail? appeared first on Ask Dave Taylor.

Categories: Technology

Newly Identified Linux Vulnerability Gives Full Access to Servers - Data Center Knowledge

Linux News - Wed, 01/28/2015 - 11:12

Data Center Knowledge

Newly Identified Linux Vulnerability Gives Full Access to Servers
Data Center Knowledge
The vulnerability in the Linux GNU C Library (shorthand: glibc) “allows attackers to remotely take control of an entire system without having any prior knowledge of system credentials,” according to a statement released Tuesday morning by Qualys, a ...

Categories: Linux

Justice Department: Default Encryption Has Created a 'Zone of Lawlessness'

Slashdot.org - Wed, 01/28/2015 - 11:04
Jason Koebler writes: Leslie Caldwell, an assistant attorney general at the Justice Department, said Tuesday that the department is "very concerned" by the Google's and Apple's decision to automatically encrypt all data on Android and iOS devices. "We understand the value of encryption and the importance of security," she said. "But we're very concerned they not lead to the creation of what I would call a 'zone of lawlessness,' where there's evidence that we could have lawful access through a court order that we're prohibited from getting because of a company's technological choices.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Justice Department: Default Encryption Has Created a 'Zone of Lawlessness'

Slashdot.org - Wed, 01/28/2015 - 11:04
Jason Koebler writes: Leslie Caldwell, an assistant attorney general at the Justice Department, said Tuesday that the department is "very concerned" by the Google's and Apple's decision to automatically encrypt all data on Android and iOS devices. "We understand the value of encryption and the importance of security," she said. "But we're very concerned they not lead to the creation of what I would call a 'zone of lawlessness,' where there's evidence that we could have lawful access through a court order that we're prohibited from getting because of a company's technological choices.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Justice Department: Default Encryption Has Created a 'Zone of Lawlessness'

Slashdot.org - Wed, 01/28/2015 - 11:04
Jason Koebler writes: Leslie Caldwell, an assistant attorney general at the Justice Department, said Tuesday that the department is "very concerned" by the Google's and Apple's decision to automatically encrypt all data on Android and iOS devices. "We understand the value of encryption and the importance of security," she said. "But we're very concerned they not lead to the creation of what I would call a 'zone of lawlessness,' where there's evidence that we could have lawful access through a court order that we're prohibited from getting because of a company's technological choices.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Justice Department: Default Encryption Has Created a 'Zone of Lawlessness'

Slashdot.org - Wed, 01/28/2015 - 11:04
Jason Koebler writes: Leslie Caldwell, an assistant attorney general at the Justice Department, said Tuesday that the department is "very concerned" by the Google's and Apple's decision to automatically encrypt all data on Android and iOS devices. "We understand the value of encryption and the importance of security," she said. "But we're very concerned they not lead to the creation of what I would call a 'zone of lawlessness,' where there's evidence that we could have lawful access through a court order that we're prohibited from getting because of a company's technological choices.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Justice Department: Default Encryption Has Created a 'Zone of Lawlessness'

Slashdot.org - Wed, 01/28/2015 - 11:04
Jason Koebler writes: Leslie Caldwell, an assistant attorney general at the Justice Department, said Tuesday that the department is "very concerned" by the Google's and Apple's decision to automatically encrypt all data on Android and iOS devices. "We understand the value of encryption and the importance of security," she said. "But we're very concerned they not lead to the creation of what I would call a 'zone of lawlessness,' where there's evidence that we could have lawful access through a court order that we're prohibited from getting because of a company's technological choices.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Justice Department: Default Encryption Has Created a 'Zone of Lawlessness'

Slashdot.org - Wed, 01/28/2015 - 11:04
Jason Koebler writes: Leslie Caldwell, an assistant attorney general at the Justice Department, said Tuesday that the department is "very concerned" by the Google's and Apple's decision to automatically encrypt all data on Android and iOS devices. "We understand the value of encryption and the importance of security," she said. "But we're very concerned they not lead to the creation of what I would call a 'zone of lawlessness,' where there's evidence that we could have lawful access through a court order that we're prohibited from getting because of a company's technological choices.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Justice Department: Default Encryption Has Created a 'Zone of Lawlessness'

Slashdot.org - Wed, 01/28/2015 - 11:04
Jason Koebler writes: Leslie Caldwell, an assistant attorney general at the Justice Department, said Tuesday that the department is "very concerned" by the Google's and Apple's decision to automatically encrypt all data on Android and iOS devices. "We understand the value of encryption and the importance of security," she said. "But we're very concerned they not lead to the creation of what I would call a 'zone of lawlessness,' where there's evidence that we could have lawful access through a court order that we're prohibited from getting because of a company's technological choices.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








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