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Empathy For Virtual Characters Studied With FMRI Brain Imaging

Slashdot.org - Thu, 07/24/2014 - 09:15
vrml (3027321) writes "A novel brain imaging study published by the prestigious Neuroimage journal sheds light on different reactions that players' brains display when they meet a virtual character in a game world. While their head was inside a fMRI machine, participants played an interactive virtual experience in which they had to survive a serious fire emergency in a building by reaching an exit as soon as possible. However, when they finally arrived at the exit, they also found a virtual character trapped under an heavy cabinet, begging them for help. Some participants chose not to help the character and took the exit, while others stopped to help although the fire became more and more serious and moving away the cabinet required considerable time. Functional brain imaging showed activation of very different brain areas in players when they met the character. When there was an increased functional connectivity of the brain salience network, which suggests an enhanced sensitivity to the threatening situation and potential danger, players ignored the character screams and went for the exit. In those players who helped the character, there was an engagement of the medial prefrontal and temporo-parietal cortices, which in the neuroscience literature are associated with the human ability of taking the perspective of other individuals and making altruistic choices. The paper concludes by emphasizing how virtual worlds can be a salient and ecologically valid stimulus for modern social neuroscience."

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Empathy For Virtual Characters Studied With FMRI Brain Imaging

Slashdot.org - Thu, 07/24/2014 - 09:15
vrml (3027321) writes "A novel brain imaging study published by the prestigious Neuroimage journal sheds light on different reactions that players' brains display when they meet a virtual character in a game world. While their head was inside a fMRI machine, participants played an interactive virtual experience in which they had to survive a serious fire emergency in a building by reaching an exit as soon as possible. However, when they finally arrived at the exit, they also found a virtual character trapped under an heavy cabinet, begging them for help. Some participants chose not to help the character and took the exit, while others stopped to help although the fire became more and more serious and moving away the cabinet required considerable time. Functional brain imaging showed activation of very different brain areas in players when they met the character. When there was an increased functional connectivity of the brain salience network, which suggests an enhanced sensitivity to the threatening situation and potential danger, players ignored the character screams and went for the exit. In those players who helped the character, there was an engagement of the medial prefrontal and temporo-parietal cortices, which in the neuroscience literature are associated with the human ability of taking the perspective of other individuals and making altruistic choices. The paper concludes by emphasizing how virtual worlds can be a salient and ecologically valid stimulus for modern social neuroscience."

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Empathy For Virtual Characters Studied With FMRI Brain Imaging

Slashdot.org - Thu, 07/24/2014 - 09:15
vrml (3027321) writes "A novel brain imaging study published by the prestigious Neuroimage journal sheds light on different reactions that players' brains display when they meet a virtual character in a game world. While their head was inside a fMRI machine, participants played an interactive virtual experience in which they had to survive a serious fire emergency in a building by reaching an exit as soon as possible. However, when they finally arrived at the exit, they also found a virtual character trapped under an heavy cabinet, begging them for help. Some participants chose not to help the character and took the exit, while others stopped to help although the fire became more and more serious and moving away the cabinet required considerable time. Functional brain imaging showed activation of very different brain areas in players when they met the character. When there was an increased functional connectivity of the brain salience network, which suggests an enhanced sensitivity to the threatening situation and potential danger, players ignored the character screams and went for the exit. In those players who helped the character, there was an engagement of the medial prefrontal and temporo-parietal cortices, which in the neuroscience literature are associated with the human ability of taking the perspective of other individuals and making altruistic choices. The paper concludes by emphasizing how virtual worlds can be a salient and ecologically valid stimulus for modern social neuroscience."

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Empathy For Virtual Characters Studied With FMRI Brain Imaging

Slashdot.org - Thu, 07/24/2014 - 09:15
vrml (3027321) writes "A novel brain imaging study published by the prestigious Neuroimage journal sheds light on different reactions that players' brains display when they meet a virtual character in a game world. While their head was inside a fMRI machine, participants played an interactive virtual experience in which they had to survive a serious fire emergency in a building by reaching an exit as soon as possible. However, when they finally arrived at the exit, they also found a virtual character trapped under an heavy cabinet, begging them for help. Some participants chose not to help the character and took the exit, while others stopped to help although the fire became more and more serious and moving away the cabinet required considerable time. Functional brain imaging showed activation of very different brain areas in players when they met the character. When there was an increased functional connectivity of the brain salience network, which suggests an enhanced sensitivity to the threatening situation and potential danger, players ignored the character screams and went for the exit. In those players who helped the character, there was an engagement of the medial prefrontal and temporo-parietal cortices, which in the neuroscience literature are associated with the human ability of taking the perspective of other individuals and making altruistic choices. The paper concludes by emphasizing how virtual worlds can be a salient and ecologically valid stimulus for modern social neuroscience."

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Empathy For Virtual Characters Studied With FMRI Brain Imaging

Slashdot.org - Thu, 07/24/2014 - 09:15
vrml (3027321) writes "A novel brain imaging study published by the prestigious Neuroimage journal sheds light on different reactions that players' brains display when they meet a virtual character in a game world. While their head was inside a fMRI machine, participants played an interactive virtual experience in which they had to survive a serious fire emergency in a building by reaching an exit as soon as possible. However, when they finally arrived at the exit, they also found a virtual character trapped under an heavy cabinet, begging them for help. Some participants chose not to help the character and took the exit, while others stopped to help although the fire became more and more serious and moving away the cabinet required considerable time. Functional brain imaging showed activation of very different brain areas in players when they met the character. When there was an increased functional connectivity of the brain salience network, which suggests an enhanced sensitivity to the threatening situation and potential danger, players ignored the character screams and went for the exit. In those players who helped the character, there was an engagement of the medial prefrontal and temporo-parietal cortices, which in the neuroscience literature are associated with the human ability of taking the perspective of other individuals and making altruistic choices. The paper concludes by emphasizing how virtual worlds can be a salient and ecologically valid stimulus for modern social neuroscience."

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Empathy For Virtual Characters Studied With FMRI Brain Imaging

Slashdot.org - Thu, 07/24/2014 - 09:15
vrml (3027321) writes "A novel brain imaging study published by the prestigious Neuroimage journal sheds light on different reactions that players' brains display when they meet a virtual character in a game world. While their head was inside a fMRI machine, participants played an interactive virtual experience in which they had to survive a serious fire emergency in a building by reaching an exit as soon as possible. However, when they finally arrived at the exit, they also found a virtual character trapped under an heavy cabinet, begging them for help. Some participants chose not to help the character and took the exit, while others stopped to help although the fire became more and more serious and moving away the cabinet required considerable time. Functional brain imaging showed activation of very different brain areas in players when they met the character. When there was an increased functional connectivity of the brain salience network, which suggests an enhanced sensitivity to the threatening situation and potential danger, players ignored the character screams and went for the exit. In those players who helped the character, there was an engagement of the medial prefrontal and temporo-parietal cortices, which in the neuroscience literature are associated with the human ability of taking the perspective of other individuals and making altruistic choices. The paper concludes by emphasizing how virtual worlds can be a salient and ecologically valid stimulus for modern social neuroscience."

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Empathy For Virtual Characters Studied With FMRI Brain Imaging

Slashdot.org - Thu, 07/24/2014 - 09:15
vrml (3027321) writes "A novel brain imaging study published by the prestigious Neuroimage journal sheds light on different reactions that players' brains display when they meet a virtual character in a game world. While their head was inside a fMRI machine, participants played an interactive virtual experience in which they had to survive a serious fire emergency in a building by reaching an exit as soon as possible. However, when they finally arrived at the exit, they also found a virtual character trapped under an heavy cabinet, begging them for help. Some participants chose not to help the character and took the exit, while others stopped to help although the fire became more and more serious and moving away the cabinet required considerable time. Functional brain imaging showed activation of very different brain areas in players when they met the character. When there was an increased functional connectivity of the brain salience network, which suggests an enhanced sensitivity to the threatening situation and potential danger, players ignored the character screams and went for the exit. In those players who helped the character, there was an engagement of the medial prefrontal and temporo-parietal cortices, which in the neuroscience literature are associated with the human ability of taking the perspective of other individuals and making altruistic choices. The paper concludes by emphasizing how virtual worlds can be a salient and ecologically valid stimulus for modern social neuroscience."

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








How do I disable theme “sounds” in Windows 8?

AskDaveTaylor - Thu, 07/24/2014 - 09:11

Considering that the majority of Microsoft’s business comes from enterprise customers, it’s a real surprise that so many of the Windows themes include sounds and audio effects. I know exactly what you’re talking about, though, because when I switched to a tropical beaches theme, suddenly I’d be hearing the sound of an ocean wave breaking on the shore every time I launched a program. Cute the first time, mildly amusing the tenth, but by the hundredth time? Not so much.

As with so much in Windows 8, the fast way to fix it is to use the search charm. Honestly, I don’t really even navigate through the Settings menu any more because Microsoft did such a great job of integrating system tasks into the search results. (still waiting for that to show up in Mac OS X, actually).

In this instance, just do a search for “theme” and see what shows up:

There’s what we want, as match #2: “Change the theme”. How easy is that?

Click on “Change the theme” and the Personalization window opens up, ready to modify:

Look along the bottom row where it shows “Sounds” as one of the choices.

Got it? Click on it to get to the Sound Theme personalization area:

One thing to note immediately is that here’s where you can disable the Windows Startup sound if you’d like to stop that incessant chime every time you boot!

You can also fine tune what has a sound associated with it on a per-event basis. Maybe you like the race car sounds when you start up the system and just want to disable the window opening sound? Scroll down to find the appropriate program event and click on the little speaker icon to its left.

Or you can just mute the entire sound theme at once:

Yes, I choose “No Sounds” on mine because while I love the visual appearance of the seashore theme, I really don’t like any audio associated with actions on my computer. Nice and quiet works just fine for me.

A click on “Apply” to set the change and…

Ah heck, do you want to? In my case, I just tweak the screensavers after I pick a theme, so my response was “No”. You might make a different choice!

To confirm it worked, the main Personalization window should now display this along the bottom:

No Sounds. Is good.

Done.

The post How do I disable theme “sounds” in Windows 8? appeared first on Ask Dave Taylor.

Categories: Technology

Linux Foundation SysAdmin Eric Searcy Lives By Regex - Linux.com (blog)

Linux News - Thu, 07/24/2014 - 09:09

Linux Foundation SysAdmin Eric Searcy Lives By Regex
Linux.com (blog)
Eric Searcy: My first sysadmin job was in 2002, when I set up and began maintaining a Slackware Linux server as a Samba domain controller, file/print server, and DNS server for an office that had about a dozen Microsoft Windows 98 desktops. When did ...

Categories: Linux

Do some Excel Work by pariotklipove

Freelancer.com - Thu, 07/24/2014 - 09:03
I want to convert notepad csv files into Excel ones please help me budget is 50$ (Budget: ₹1500-₹12500 INR, Jobs: Customer Support, Desktop Support, Linux, SQL, System Admin)
Categories: Freelance, Linux

Write some Software can control java engine by webhcmvn

Freelancer.com - Thu, 07/24/2014 - 09:01
hi i need make a site that using jquery ui. it using web service did by java. Thanks (Budget: $30-$250 USD, Jobs: Android, iPhone, Linux, PHP, Software Architecture)
Categories: Freelance, Linux

KDE 5 Delivers New Linux Desktop Environment

LinuxToday.com - Thu, 07/24/2014 - 09:00

eWEEK: In this slide show, eWEEK examines some of the key features of KDE Plasma 5.

Categories: Linux

Write some Software by benett

Freelancer.com - Thu, 07/24/2014 - 08:57
I need to setup a proxy built on Squid and eCAP capable of replacing a string in HTML response. It'll be doing that just for a list of declared URLs. (Budget: $10-$30 USD, Jobs: Linux, Network Administration)
Categories: Freelance, Linux

GOG.com now supports Linux

OSNews.com - Thu, 07/24/2014 - 08:57
A while ago, we've announced our plans to add Linux support as one of the features of our digital platform, with 100 games on the launch day sometime this fall. We've put much time and effort into this project and now we've found ourselves with over 50 titles, classic and new, prepared for distribution, site infrastructure ready, support team trained and standing by, and absolutely no reason to wait until October or November. We're still aiming to have at least 100 Linux games in the coming months, but we've decided not to delay the launch just for the sake of having a nice-looking number to show off to the press. It's not about them, after all, it's about you. So, one of the most popular site feature requests on our community wishlist is granted today: Linux support has officially arrived on GOG.com! Good on 'm.

Dutch Court Says Government Can Receive Bulk Data from NSA

Slashdot.org - Thu, 07/24/2014 - 08:31
jfruh (300774) writes Dutch law makes it illegal for the Dutch intelligence services to conduct mass data interception programs. But, according to a court in the Hague, it's perfectly all right for the Dutch government to request that data from the U.S.'s National Security Agency, and doing so doesn't violate any treaties or international law.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Do some Excel Work by dktrustme

Freelancer.com - Thu, 07/24/2014 - 08:12
I want to convert notepad csv files into Excel ones please help me budget is 50$ (Budget: ₹1500-₹12500 INR, Jobs: Customer Support, Desktop Support, Linux, SQL, System Admin)
Categories: Freelance, Linux

Distro Watch: The Best Linux Distributions For 2014 - MakeUseOf

Linux News - Thu, 07/24/2014 - 08:11

Distro Watch: The Best Linux Distributions For 2014
MakeUseOf
One of our writers, Akshata, has found that ElementaryOS is the perfect Linux distro for her to switch completely from Windows. Some people (primarily power users) might not like the super simplicity of ElementaryOS, but people who just want a system ...

Categories: Linux

IT-Administrator by CinePost

Freelancer.com - Thu, 07/24/2014 - 08:07
Die CinePostproduction GmbH ist eines von Deutschlands führenden Postproduktionsunternehmen mit bundesweiten Niederlassungen. Als Full Service-Anbieter sind wir technischer und kreativer Partner unserer... (Budget: €18-€36 EUR, Jobs: Active Directory, Linux, Network Administration, Script Install, System Admin)
Categories: Freelance, Linux

BitKey: A secure, Debian-based Live OS for bitcoin transactions

LinuxToday.com - Thu, 07/24/2014 - 08:00

 LinuxBSDos: BitKey itself is a simple solution for bitcoin users.

Categories: Linux

FCC Reminds ISPs That They Can Be Fined For Lacking Transparency

Slashdot.org - Thu, 07/24/2014 - 07:49
An anonymous reader writes The FCC issued a notice on Wednesday reminding ISPs that, according to the still-intact transparency rule of the 2010 Open Internet Order, they are required to be transparent about their services. "The FCC's transparency rule requires that consumers get the information they need to make informed choices about the broadband services they purchase." Applicable scenarios include "poorly worded service offers or inaccurate counts of data against a data cap...[as well as] blocking or slowing certain types of traffic without explaining that to the customer." The transparency rule gives the FCC the power to fine ISPs for non-compliance.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








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